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Article: A population-based study of juvenile disc degeneration and its association with overweight and obesity, low back pain, and diminished functional status

TitleA population-based study of juvenile disc degeneration and its association with overweight and obesity, low back pain, and diminished functional status
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherJournal of Bone and Joint Surgery. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.jbjs.org
Citation
Journal Of Bone And Joint Surgery - Series A, 2011, v. 93 n. 7, p. 662-670 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Little is known regarding juvenile disc degeneration in individuals with normal spinal alignment. Consequently, the purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence, determinants, and clinical relevance associated with juvenile disc degeneration of the lumbar spine in individuals without spinal deformities. Methods: A cross-sectional assessment of disc degeneration in juveniles was performed as part of a population-based study of 1989 Southern Chinese volunteers. Adolescents and young adults from thirteen to twenty years of age were defined as "juveniles." Juvenile subjects with no spinal deformity (n = 83) were stratified into two groups, those with and those without juvenile disc degeneration. Sagittal T2-weighted magnetic resonance images (MRI) were evaluated for the presence and extent of disc degeneration as well as other spinal findings. Demographics were assessed and clinical profiles were collected with use of standardized questionnaires. Results: Juvenile disc degeneration was present in 35% (twenty-nine) of the juveniles without spinal deformity. Disc bulging or extrusion (p < 0.001), high-intensity zones on MRI (p = 0.040), and greater weight (p < 0.001) and height (p = 0.002) were significantly more prevalent in subjects with juvenile disc degeneration. Adjusted multivariate logistic regression modeling demonstrated that Asian-modified body-mass index (BMI) values in the overweight or obese range had a significant association with juvenile disc degeneration (odds ratio = 14.19; 95% confidence interval = 1.44 to 140.40; p = 0.023). Overweight and obese individuals had greater severity of disc degeneration than underweight and normal-weight individuals (p = 0.036). Furthermore, individuals with juvenile disc degeneration had an increased prevalence of low back pain and/or sciatica (p = 0.002), greater low back pain intensity (p < 0.001), diminished social functioning (p = 0.049), and greater physical disability (p < 0.05) than individuals without disc degeneration. The p value of <0.05 for physical disability represents both the physical function (p = 0.006) and the physical component (p = 0.032) of the SF-36. Conclusions: This study demonstrated that the presence of juvenile disc degeneration was strongly associated with overweight and obesity, low back pain, increased low back pain intensity, and diminished physical and social functioning. Furthermore, an elevated BMI was significantly associated with increased severity of disc degeneration. This study has public health implications regarding overweight and obesity and the development of lumbar disc disease. Copyright © 2011 by the journal of bone and joint surgery, incorporated.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/135947
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.163
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.938
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Area of Excellence Programme of Hong Kong
Funding Information:

In support of their research for or preparation of this work, one or more of the authors received, in any one year, outside funding or grants in excess of $10,000 from the Area of Excellence Programme of Hong Kong. Neither they nor a member of their immediate families received payments or other benefits or a commitment or agreement to provide such benefits from a commercial entity.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSamartzis, Den_HK
dc.contributor.authorKarppinen, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMok, Fen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFong, DYTen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLuk, KDKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheung, KMCen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-27T02:00:25Z-
dc.date.available2011-07-27T02:00:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Bone And Joint Surgery - Series A, 2011, v. 93 n. 7, p. 662-670en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0021-9355en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/135947-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Little is known regarding juvenile disc degeneration in individuals with normal spinal alignment. Consequently, the purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence, determinants, and clinical relevance associated with juvenile disc degeneration of the lumbar spine in individuals without spinal deformities. Methods: A cross-sectional assessment of disc degeneration in juveniles was performed as part of a population-based study of 1989 Southern Chinese volunteers. Adolescents and young adults from thirteen to twenty years of age were defined as "juveniles." Juvenile subjects with no spinal deformity (n = 83) were stratified into two groups, those with and those without juvenile disc degeneration. Sagittal T2-weighted magnetic resonance images (MRI) were evaluated for the presence and extent of disc degeneration as well as other spinal findings. Demographics were assessed and clinical profiles were collected with use of standardized questionnaires. Results: Juvenile disc degeneration was present in 35% (twenty-nine) of the juveniles without spinal deformity. Disc bulging or extrusion (p < 0.001), high-intensity zones on MRI (p = 0.040), and greater weight (p < 0.001) and height (p = 0.002) were significantly more prevalent in subjects with juvenile disc degeneration. Adjusted multivariate logistic regression modeling demonstrated that Asian-modified body-mass index (BMI) values in the overweight or obese range had a significant association with juvenile disc degeneration (odds ratio = 14.19; 95% confidence interval = 1.44 to 140.40; p = 0.023). Overweight and obese individuals had greater severity of disc degeneration than underweight and normal-weight individuals (p = 0.036). Furthermore, individuals with juvenile disc degeneration had an increased prevalence of low back pain and/or sciatica (p = 0.002), greater low back pain intensity (p < 0.001), diminished social functioning (p = 0.049), and greater physical disability (p < 0.05) than individuals without disc degeneration. The p value of <0.05 for physical disability represents both the physical function (p = 0.006) and the physical component (p = 0.032) of the SF-36. Conclusions: This study demonstrated that the presence of juvenile disc degeneration was strongly associated with overweight and obesity, low back pain, increased low back pain intensity, and diminished physical and social functioning. Furthermore, an elevated BMI was significantly associated with increased severity of disc degeneration. This study has public health implications regarding overweight and obesity and the development of lumbar disc disease. Copyright © 2011 by the journal of bone and joint surgery, incorporated.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJournal of Bone and Joint Surgery. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.jbjs.orgen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Bone and Joint Surgery - Series Aen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subject.meshIntervertebral Disc Degeneration - diagnosis - epidemiology-
dc.subject.meshLow Back Pain - diagnosis - epidemiology-
dc.subject.meshMobility Limitation-
dc.subject.meshOverweight - diagnosis - epidemiology-
dc.subject.meshPhysical Fitness - physiology-
dc.titleA population-based study of juvenile disc degeneration and its association with overweight and obesity, low back pain, and diminished functional statusen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailSamartzis, D: dspine@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailFong, DYT: dytfong@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLuk, KDK: hcm21000@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailCheung, KMC: cheungmc@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySamartzis, D=rp01430en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityFong, DYT=rp00253en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLuk, KDK=rp00333en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, KMC=rp00387en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.2106/JBJS.I.01568en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid21471420-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79953865229en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros187454en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros196995-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79953865229&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume93en_HK
dc.identifier.issue7en_HK
dc.identifier.spage662en_HK
dc.identifier.epage670en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1535-1386-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000289133500008-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.f100010745956-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSamartzis, D=34572771100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKarppinen, J=7004560479en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMok, F=36241964600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFong, DYT=35261710300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLuk, KDK=7201921573en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, KMC=7402406754en_HK

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