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Article: Interarticulator timing control during inspiratory phonation
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TitleInterarticulator timing control during inspiratory phonation
 
AuthorsNg, ML1
Chen, Y2
Wong, S1
Xue, S1
 
KeywordsCantonese
Inspiratory phonation
Reverse phonation
VOT
 
Issue Date2011
 
PublisherMosby, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jvoice
 
CitationJournal Of Voice, 2011, v. 25 n. 3, p. 319-325 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jvoice.2010.01.001
 
AbstractObjective: The ability of Cantonese speakers in producing aspirated and unaspirated stops and stops at different places of articulation using expiratory phonation (EP) and inspiratory phonation (IP) was compared. Interarticulator timing during stop production using EP and IP was examined. Voice onset time (VOT) associated with EP and IP stops was compared with stop identification scores by naïve listeners. Subjects and Methods: Aspirated and unaspirated voiceless stops (/p h, t h, k h, p, t, k/) followed by the vowel /a/ were produced by 15 male and 15 female Cantonese speakers using EP and IP. VOT values were measured and isolated speech samples of stop productions were identified by 10 naïve listeners. Percent correct identification of stops was obtained from the 10 listeners. Results: Perceptual data showed that production of IP stops were associated with reduced accuracy in stop identification, with predominant errors in aspiration perception. Acoustic analysis showed that IP stops were generally produced with significantly shorter VOT than their EP counterparts. In addition, effect of place of articulation on VOT was also found for both IP and EP stops, notably with velar stops being associated with significantly longer VOT values than bilabial and alveolar stops. Conclusions: The findings that IP stops were produced with shorter VOT as compared with EP stops imply that the articulatory-phonatory coordination during IP was not the same as that during EP, causing a discrepancy in the timing control between articulators. © 2011 The Voice Foundation.
 
ISSN0892-1997
2013 Impact Factor: 0.944
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.778
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jvoice.2010.01.001
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000290641500011
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorNg, ML
 
dc.contributor.authorChen, Y
 
dc.contributor.authorWong, S
 
dc.contributor.authorXue, S
 
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-27T01:35:54Z
 
dc.date.available2011-07-27T01:35:54Z
 
dc.date.issued2011
 
dc.description.abstractObjective: The ability of Cantonese speakers in producing aspirated and unaspirated stops and stops at different places of articulation using expiratory phonation (EP) and inspiratory phonation (IP) was compared. Interarticulator timing during stop production using EP and IP was examined. Voice onset time (VOT) associated with EP and IP stops was compared with stop identification scores by naïve listeners. Subjects and Methods: Aspirated and unaspirated voiceless stops (/p h, t h, k h, p, t, k/) followed by the vowel /a/ were produced by 15 male and 15 female Cantonese speakers using EP and IP. VOT values were measured and isolated speech samples of stop productions were identified by 10 naïve listeners. Percent correct identification of stops was obtained from the 10 listeners. Results: Perceptual data showed that production of IP stops were associated with reduced accuracy in stop identification, with predominant errors in aspiration perception. Acoustic analysis showed that IP stops were generally produced with significantly shorter VOT than their EP counterparts. In addition, effect of place of articulation on VOT was also found for both IP and EP stops, notably with velar stops being associated with significantly longer VOT values than bilabial and alveolar stops. Conclusions: The findings that IP stops were produced with shorter VOT as compared with EP stops imply that the articulatory-phonatory coordination during IP was not the same as that during EP, causing a discrepancy in the timing control between articulators. © 2011 The Voice Foundation.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Voice, 2011, v. 25 n. 3, p. 319-325 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jvoice.2010.01.001
 
dc.identifier.citeulike6959422
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jvoice.2010.01.001
 
dc.identifier.epage325
 
dc.identifier.hkuros187347
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000290641500011
 
dc.identifier.issn0892-1997
2013 Impact Factor: 0.944
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.778
 
dc.identifier.issue3
 
dc.identifier.pmid20346622
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79955590039
 
dc.identifier.spage319
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/135484
 
dc.identifier.volume25
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherMosby, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jvoice
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Voice
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshInhalation
 
dc.subject.meshPhonation
 
dc.subject.meshSpeech Acoustics
 
dc.subject.meshSpeech Intelligibility
 
dc.subject.meshVoice Quality
 
dc.subjectCantonese
 
dc.subjectInspiratory phonation
 
dc.subjectReverse phonation
 
dc.subjectVOT
 
dc.titleInterarticulator timing control during inspiratory phonation
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Chen, Y</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Wong, S</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Xue, S</contributor.author>
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<description.abstract>Objective: The ability of Cantonese speakers in producing aspirated and unaspirated stops and stops at different places of articulation using expiratory phonation (EP) and inspiratory phonation (IP) was compared. Interarticulator timing during stop production using EP and IP was examined. Voice onset time (VOT) associated with EP and IP stops was compared with stop identification scores by na&#239;ve listeners. Subjects and Methods: Aspirated and unaspirated voiceless stops (/p h, t h, k h, p, t, k/) followed by the vowel /a/ were produced by 15 male and 15 female Cantonese speakers using EP and IP. VOT values were measured and isolated speech samples of stop productions were identified by 10 na&#239;ve listeners. Percent correct identification of stops was obtained from the 10 listeners. Results: Perceptual data showed that production of IP stops were associated with reduced accuracy in stop identification, with predominant errors in aspiration perception. Acoustic analysis showed that IP stops were generally produced with significantly shorter VOT than their EP counterparts. In addition, effect of place of articulation on VOT was also found for both IP and EP stops, notably with velar stops being associated with significantly longer VOT values than bilabial and alveolar stops. Conclusions: The findings that IP stops were produced with shorter VOT as compared with EP stops imply that the articulatory-phonatory coordination during IP was not the same as that during EP, causing a discrepancy in the timing control between articulators. &#169; 2011 The Voice Foundation.</description.abstract>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. Duquesne University