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Article: Naming psychosis: The Hong Kong experience

TitleNaming psychosis: The Hong Kong experience
Authors
KeywordsEarly intervention
Nomenclature
Psychotic disorders
Schizophrenia
Stigmatization
Issue Date2010
PublisherBlackwell Publishing, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journal.asp?ref=1751-7885&site=1
Citation
Early Intervention In Psychiatry, 2010, v. 4 n. 4, p. 270-274 How to Cite?
AbstractAim: Schizophrenia translates in Chinese as 'Mind Split Disease' which is heavily stigmatizing. The narrow conceptualization for schizophrenia alone was insufficient, in the context of early detection and intervention for psychosis. The need for an effective Chinese translation for psychotic disorders was imminent upon the launch of the Early Assessment Service for Young People with Psychosis in Hong Kong, where public awareness strategies had to be built upon effective communication of the disorder.Methods: 'Si Jue Shi Tiao', the new term for psychosis, described 'thought and perceptual dysregulation'. This new terminology and concept was strategically introduced to the local community.Results: The term 'Si Jue Shi Tiao' was taken up well locally and had demonstrated interactions within the Chinese and East Asian communities. The public has taken in the broader concept of psychosis, in contrary to the previous concept of schizophrenia per se.Conclusions: In Hong Kong, the restrictive view of perceiving psychotic disorders as schizophrenia was broadened upon the introduction of a more embracing, less stigmatizing term 'Si Jue Shi Tiao'. Effective establishment of this term to the local vocabulary allowed a basis for communication as well as public education work. Further evaluation is necessary to determine the effectiveness of the naming and to guide further public awareness strategies. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/135427
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.889
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.071
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChiu, CPYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, MMLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, SKWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChung, DWSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHung, SFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTang, JYMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, GHYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHui, CLMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChen, EYHen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-27T01:35:00Z-
dc.date.available2011-07-27T01:35:00Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationEarly Intervention In Psychiatry, 2010, v. 4 n. 4, p. 270-274en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1751-7885en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/135427-
dc.description.abstractAim: Schizophrenia translates in Chinese as 'Mind Split Disease' which is heavily stigmatizing. The narrow conceptualization for schizophrenia alone was insufficient, in the context of early detection and intervention for psychosis. The need for an effective Chinese translation for psychotic disorders was imminent upon the launch of the Early Assessment Service for Young People with Psychosis in Hong Kong, where public awareness strategies had to be built upon effective communication of the disorder.Methods: 'Si Jue Shi Tiao', the new term for psychosis, described 'thought and perceptual dysregulation'. This new terminology and concept was strategically introduced to the local community.Results: The term 'Si Jue Shi Tiao' was taken up well locally and had demonstrated interactions within the Chinese and East Asian communities. The public has taken in the broader concept of psychosis, in contrary to the previous concept of schizophrenia per se.Conclusions: In Hong Kong, the restrictive view of perceiving psychotic disorders as schizophrenia was broadened upon the introduction of a more embracing, less stigmatizing term 'Si Jue Shi Tiao'. Effective establishment of this term to the local vocabulary allowed a basis for communication as well as public education work. Further evaluation is necessary to determine the effectiveness of the naming and to guide further public awareness strategies. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journal.asp?ref=1751-7885&site=1en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofEarly Intervention in Psychiatryen_HK
dc.rightsThe definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com-
dc.subjectEarly interventionen_HK
dc.subjectNomenclatureen_HK
dc.subjectPsychotic disordersen_HK
dc.subjectSchizophreniaen_HK
dc.subjectStigmatizationen_HK
dc.subject.meshHong Kong-
dc.subject.meshPsychotic Disorders - diagnosis-
dc.subject.meshSchizophrenia - diagnosis-
dc.subject.meshStereotyping-
dc.subject.meshTerminology as Topic-
dc.titleNaming psychosis: The Hong Kong experienceen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailChiu, CPY: chiupyc@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, MML: maylam11@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChan, SKW: kwsherry@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChen, EYH: eyhchen@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChiu, CPY=rp00291en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, MML=rp00296en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChan, SKW=rp00539en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChen, EYH=rp00392en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1751-7893.2010.00203.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20977682-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77958567465en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros187586en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77958567465&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume4en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage270en_HK
dc.identifier.epage274en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000283599400002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChiu, CPY=8627115700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, MML=13106178700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, SKW=26424509100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChung, DWS=7401719312en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHung, SF=7201936267en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTang, JYM=35086815700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, GHY=24465754400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHui, CLM=35734149500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChen, EYH=7402315729en_HK

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