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Article: Does medical student willingness to practise peer physical examination translate into action?

TitleDoes medical student willingness to practise peer physical examination translate into action?
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherInforma Healthcare. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/0142159X.asp
Citation
Medical Teacher, 2011, v. 33 n. 10, p. e528-e540 How to Cite?
Abstract
Background: Peer physical examination (PPE) is commonly used in clinical skills teaching to allow students to practice physical examination techniques on each other. Previous studies have demonstrated medical students' generally positive attitudes towards PPE, but the correlation between student attitude and actual practice of PPE has yet to be examined. Aim: To determine if a positive student attitude towards PPE leads to subsequent action. Methods: The target population were MBBS I students (20062007 cohort) admitted to the Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong. Student attitude towards PPE and subsequent practice of PPE were assessed through self-completed written questionnaires before and after the compulsory Clinical Skills Programme (CSP). Results: A total of 100/128 (78%) students completed both questionnaires, of which 83 (65%) could be linked to demographic data. All study participants were ethnically Chinese. A high level of willingness to conduct PPE persisted before and after the CSP for both male and female students. However, more than half of the students did not subsequently examine various non-intimate body regions of a fellow student during the CSP. Female students were more likely to exhibit attitudebehaviour inconsistency. Conclusion: The existing positive attitudes towards PPE need to be harnessed so that more students are encouraged to follow through and actually practise PPE, thus realizing the educational benefits of this activity. This may be done by ensuring that PPE is conducted in a safe setting while being conscientious of gender differences. Scheduled time and the use of a logbook may be useful to facilitate students practising PPE. © 2011 Informa UK Ltd All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/135193
ISSN
2013 Impact Factor: 2.045
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChen, JYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYip, ALMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, CLKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPatil, NGen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-27T01:29:40Z-
dc.date.available2011-07-27T01:29:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationMedical Teacher, 2011, v. 33 n. 10, p. e528-e540en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0142-159Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/135193-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Peer physical examination (PPE) is commonly used in clinical skills teaching to allow students to practice physical examination techniques on each other. Previous studies have demonstrated medical students' generally positive attitudes towards PPE, but the correlation between student attitude and actual practice of PPE has yet to be examined. Aim: To determine if a positive student attitude towards PPE leads to subsequent action. Methods: The target population were MBBS I students (20062007 cohort) admitted to the Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong. Student attitude towards PPE and subsequent practice of PPE were assessed through self-completed written questionnaires before and after the compulsory Clinical Skills Programme (CSP). Results: A total of 100/128 (78%) students completed both questionnaires, of which 83 (65%) could be linked to demographic data. All study participants were ethnically Chinese. A high level of willingness to conduct PPE persisted before and after the CSP for both male and female students. However, more than half of the students did not subsequently examine various non-intimate body regions of a fellow student during the CSP. Female students were more likely to exhibit attitudebehaviour inconsistency. Conclusion: The existing positive attitudes towards PPE need to be harnessed so that more students are encouraged to follow through and actually practise PPE, thus realizing the educational benefits of this activity. This may be done by ensuring that PPE is conducted in a safe setting while being conscientious of gender differences. Scheduled time and the use of a logbook may be useful to facilitate students practising PPE. © 2011 Informa UK Ltd All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherInforma Healthcare. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/0142159X.aspen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofMedical Teacheren_HK
dc.rightsMedical Teacher. Copyright © Informa Healthcare.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleDoes medical student willingness to practise peer physical examination translate into action?en_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0142-159X&volume=33&issue=10&spage=e528&epage=e540&date=2011&atitle=Does+medical+student+willingness+to+practice+peer+physical+examination+translate+into+action?-
dc.identifier.emailChen, JY: juliechen@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, CLK: clklam@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailPatil, NG: ngpatil@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChen, JY=rp00526en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, CLK=rp00350en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityPatil, NG=rp00388en_HK
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.3109/0142159X.2011.599893en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid21942489-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-80053225401en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros187744en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-80053225401&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume33en_HK
dc.identifier.issue10en_HK
dc.identifier.spagee528en_HK
dc.identifier.epagee540en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1466-187X-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000295218300003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChen, JY=24376037700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYip, ALM=39862565600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, CLK=24755913900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPatil, NG=7103152514en_HK

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