File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Child maltreatment polyvictimization: Rates and short-term effects on adjustment in a representative Hong Kong sample

TitleChild maltreatment polyvictimization: Rates and short-term effects on adjustment in a representative Hong Kong sample
Authors
KeywordsChild abuse and neglect
Corporal punishment
Intimate partner violence
Polyvictimization
Issue Date2011
PublisherAmerican Psychological Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.apa.org/pubs/journals/vio/index.aspx
Citation
Psychology Of Violence, 2011, v. 1 n. 1, p. 4-15 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: This article examines the unique effects of multiple forms of victimization, namely child abuse and neglect (CAN) and exposure to parental intimate partner violence (IPV), on children's self-blame, feelings of being threatened, self-esteem, and ability to control anger. Method: The cross-sectional study recruited a population-based sample of 2,062 children aged 12-17 years in Hong Kong. Structured questionnaires were used to collect data from the children. The prevalence rate of the co-occurrence of exposure to IPV and CAN in the Chinese population, and the unique impacts of exposure to IPV and CAN on children were examined. Results: The results show that 13.1% of the children had experienced CAN, and 6.5% had witnessed parental IPV. Among those families characterized by IPV, 61.1% were involved in child abuse in the preceding year of the study. Participants who had experienced both CAN and exposure to parental IPV reported lower levels of self-esteem and higher rates of being aggressive and violent, and feeling threatened. These children also reported the highest levels of feeling that their well-being was threatened and of blaming themselves for parental violence and parental discipline. Conclusions: The findings reemphasize the important need for public policy on child and youth victimization that encourages social workers and Child Protective Services to screen for child polyvictimization in cases of suspected/reported child abuse. © 2011 American Psychological Association.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/134468
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.79
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.468
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, KLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorBrownridge, DAen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYan, Een_HK
dc.contributor.authorFong, DYTen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTiwari, Aen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-06-17T09:21:20Z-
dc.date.available2011-06-17T09:21:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPsychology Of Violence, 2011, v. 1 n. 1, p. 4-15en_HK
dc.identifier.issn2152-0828en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/134468-
dc.description.abstractObjective: This article examines the unique effects of multiple forms of victimization, namely child abuse and neglect (CAN) and exposure to parental intimate partner violence (IPV), on children's self-blame, feelings of being threatened, self-esteem, and ability to control anger. Method: The cross-sectional study recruited a population-based sample of 2,062 children aged 12-17 years in Hong Kong. Structured questionnaires were used to collect data from the children. The prevalence rate of the co-occurrence of exposure to IPV and CAN in the Chinese population, and the unique impacts of exposure to IPV and CAN on children were examined. Results: The results show that 13.1% of the children had experienced CAN, and 6.5% had witnessed parental IPV. Among those families characterized by IPV, 61.1% were involved in child abuse in the preceding year of the study. Participants who had experienced both CAN and exposure to parental IPV reported lower levels of self-esteem and higher rates of being aggressive and violent, and feeling threatened. These children also reported the highest levels of feeling that their well-being was threatened and of blaming themselves for parental violence and parental discipline. Conclusions: The findings reemphasize the important need for public policy on child and youth victimization that encourages social workers and Child Protective Services to screen for child polyvictimization in cases of suspected/reported child abuse. © 2011 American Psychological Association.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Psychological Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.apa.org/pubs/journals/vio/index.aspxen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPsychology of Violenceen_HK
dc.rightsPsychology of Violence. Copyright © American Psychological Association.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectChild abuse and neglect-
dc.subjectCorporal punishment-
dc.subjectIntimate partner violence-
dc.subjectPolyvictimization-
dc.titleChild maltreatment polyvictimization: Rates and short-term effects on adjustment in a representative Hong Kong sampleen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=2152-0828&volume=1&issue=1&spage=4&epage=15&date=2011&atitle=Child+maltreatment+polyvictimization:+rates+and+short-term+effects+on+adjustment+in+a+representative+Hong+Kong+sample-
dc.identifier.emailChan, KL: eklchan@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailYan, E: elsieyan@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailFong, DYT: dytfong@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailTiwari, A: tiwari@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChan, KL=rp00572en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityYan, E=rp00600en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityFong, DYT=rp00253en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityTiwari, A=rp00441en_HK
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1037/a0020284en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79951523071en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros185735en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79951523071&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume1en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage4en_HK
dc.identifier.epage15en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000208635500002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, KL=8504873300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBrownridge, DA=6601984986en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYan, E=7003669102en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFong, DYT=35261710300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTiwari, A=7101772273en_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats