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Conference Paper: ISSLS prize winner: Prevalence, determinants, and association of schmorl nodes of the lumbar spine with disc degeneration: A population-based study of 2449 individuals

TitleISSLS prize winner: Prevalence, determinants, and association of schmorl nodes of the lumbar spine with disc degeneration: A population-based study of 2449 individuals
Authors
Keywordsdisc degeneration
lumbar
magnetic resonance imaging
Schmorl nodes
Issue Date2010
PublisherLippincott, Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.spinejournal.com
Citation
The 2010 Annual Meeting of the International Society for the Study of the Lumbar Spine (ISSLS), Auckland, New Zealand, 13-17 April 2010. In Spine, 2010, v. 35 n. 21, p. 1944-1952 How to Cite?
AbstractStudy Design. A cross-sectional population-based magnetic resonance imaging study of Schmorl nodes (SN) in the lumbar spine. Objective. To determine the prevalence and potential determinants of SN, and their association with intervertebral disc degeneration. Summary of Backgrounf Data. SN represent intravertebral disc herniation and are commonly seen in the spine. Their reported prevalence and determinants vary, and their association with disc degeneration remains uncertain. Data based on this large scale population-based study of intervertebral disc degeneration would provide important information for understanding SN and their pathomechanism. Methods. Sagittal T2-weighted magnetic resonance imagings of the lumbar spine were analyzed in 2449 volunteers. Two independent observers assessed the images for the presence of SN, and scored for additional radiologic features (e.g., severity of degeneration, presence of disc bulge/extrusion). Subject demographics were assessed by standardized questionnaire. Results. SN were found in 16.4% (n = 401; 219 males, 182 females; mean age = 42.3) of our study population (981 males, 1468 females; mean age = 40.4), being most common at L1/2 and L2/3 (54.1%). Multivariate logistic regression revealed that males, taller and heavier individuals had an increased likelihood of SN (P < 0.005), but association between SN and age were not discerned. Overall presence of SN was associated with disc degeneration (P < 0.001), and linearly correlated (R2 = 0.97) with increase in severity of degeneration. SN were particularly associated with severe disc degeneration at L1/2 and L2/3 with 22- to 15-fold increased odds, respectively (P < 0.0001), but less than 5-fold increased odds (P < 0.001) were noted in the lower lumbar spine. Conclusion. In a population-based cohort, 16.4% of Southern Chinese subjects had SN at 1 or more lumbar levels. Males, taller and heavier individuals had increased likelihood of SN. Interestingly, SN were highly associated with severity of disc degeneration. © 2010, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.
DescriptionISSLS prize winner
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/133109
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.439
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.459
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
University Grants Committee of Hong Kong
Area of Excellence SchemeAoE/M-04/04
Research Grants Council of Hong KongHKU7509/03 M
Funding Information:

Supported by grants from the University Grants Committee of Hong Kong, the Area of Excellence Scheme (AoE/M-04/04) and the Research Grants Council of Hong Kong (HKU7509/03 M).

References
Grants

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMok, FPSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSamartzis, Den_HK
dc.contributor.authorKarppinen, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLuk, KDKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFong, DYTen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheung, KMCen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-29T07:10:21Z-
dc.date.available2011-04-29T07:10:21Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationThe 2010 Annual Meeting of the International Society for the Study of the Lumbar Spine (ISSLS), Auckland, New Zealand, 13-17 April 2010. In Spine, 2010, v. 35 n. 21, p. 1944-1952en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0362-2436en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/133109-
dc.descriptionISSLS prize winner-
dc.description.abstractStudy Design. A cross-sectional population-based magnetic resonance imaging study of Schmorl nodes (SN) in the lumbar spine. Objective. To determine the prevalence and potential determinants of SN, and their association with intervertebral disc degeneration. Summary of Backgrounf Data. SN represent intravertebral disc herniation and are commonly seen in the spine. Their reported prevalence and determinants vary, and their association with disc degeneration remains uncertain. Data based on this large scale population-based study of intervertebral disc degeneration would provide important information for understanding SN and their pathomechanism. Methods. Sagittal T2-weighted magnetic resonance imagings of the lumbar spine were analyzed in 2449 volunteers. Two independent observers assessed the images for the presence of SN, and scored for additional radiologic features (e.g., severity of degeneration, presence of disc bulge/extrusion). Subject demographics were assessed by standardized questionnaire. Results. SN were found in 16.4% (n = 401; 219 males, 182 females; mean age = 42.3) of our study population (981 males, 1468 females; mean age = 40.4), being most common at L1/2 and L2/3 (54.1%). Multivariate logistic regression revealed that males, taller and heavier individuals had an increased likelihood of SN (P < 0.005), but association between SN and age were not discerned. Overall presence of SN was associated with disc degeneration (P < 0.001), and linearly correlated (R2 = 0.97) with increase in severity of degeneration. SN were particularly associated with severe disc degeneration at L1/2 and L2/3 with 22- to 15-fold increased odds, respectively (P < 0.0001), but less than 5-fold increased odds (P < 0.001) were noted in the lower lumbar spine. Conclusion. In a population-based cohort, 16.4% of Southern Chinese subjects had SN at 1 or more lumbar levels. Males, taller and heavier individuals had increased likelihood of SN. Interestingly, SN were highly associated with severity of disc degeneration. © 2010, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.en_HK
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherLippincott, Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.spinejournal.comen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofSpineen_HK
dc.subjectdisc degenerationen_HK
dc.subjectlumbaren_HK
dc.subjectmagnetic resonance imagingen_HK
dc.subjectSchmorl nodesen_HK
dc.subject.meshAsian Continental Ancestry Group-
dc.subject.meshIntervertebral Disk - pathology - physiopathology-
dc.subject.meshIntervertebral Disk Degeneration - epidemiology - pathology - physiopathology-
dc.subject.meshLumbar Vertebrae - pathology - physiopathology-
dc.subject.meshMagnetic Resonance Imaging - methods-
dc.titleISSLS prize winner: Prevalence, determinants, and association of schmorl nodes of the lumbar spine with disc degeneration: A population-based study of 2449 individualsen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0362-2436&volume=35&issue=21&spage=1944&epage=1952&date=2010&atitle=ISSLS+prize+winner:+prevalence,+determinants,+and+association+of+Schmorl+nodes+of+the+lumbar+spine+with+disc+degeneration:+a+population-based+study+of+2449+individuals-
dc.identifier.emailSamartzis, D: dspine@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLuk, KDK: hcm21000@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailFong, DYT: dytfong@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailCheung, KMC: cheungmc@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySamartzis, D=rp01430en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLuk, KDK=rp00333en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityFong, DYT=rp00253en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, KMC=rp00387en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/BRS.0b013e3181d534f3en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20838277-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77958016076en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros173012-
dc.identifier.hkuros173076-
dc.identifier.hkuros180331-
dc.identifier.hkuros196986-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77958016076&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume35en_HK
dc.identifier.issue21en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1944en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1952en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000282481200007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.description.otherThe 2010 Annual Meeting of the International Society for the Study of the Lumbar Spine (ISSLS), Auckland, New Zealand, 13-17 April 2010. In Spine, 2010, v. 35 n. 21, p. 1944-1952-
dc.relation.projectDevelopmental genomics and skeletal research-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMok, FPS=36241964600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSamartzis, D=34572771100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKarppinen, J=7004560479en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLuk, KDK=7201921573en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFong, DYT=35261710300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, KMC=7402406754en_HK

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