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Article: DC-SIGN and L-SIGN: The SIGNs for infection

TitleDC-SIGN and L-SIGN: The SIGNs for infection
Authors
KeywordsAssociation study
Infection
Lectins
Molecular genetics
Population genetics
Structural biology
Issue Date2008
PublisherSpringer. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/biomed/molecular/journal/109
Citation
Journal Of Molecular Medicine, 2008, v. 86 n. 8, p. 861-874 How to Cite?
AbstractTwo closely related trans-membrane C-type lectins dendritic cell-specific intracellular adhesion molecules (ICAM)-3 grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN or CD209) and liver/lymph node-specific ICAM-3 grabbing non-integrin (L-SIGN also known as DC-SIGNR, CD209L or CLEC4M) directly recognize a wide range of micro-organisms of major impact on public health. Both genes have long been considered to share similar overall structure and ligand-binding characteristics. This review presents more recent biochemical and structural studies, which show that they have distinct ligand-binding properties and different physiological functions. Of importance in both these genes is the presence of an extra-cellular domain consisting of an extended neck region encoded by tandem repeats that support the carbohydrate-recognition domain, which plays a crucial role in influencing the pathogen-binding properties of these receptors. The notable difference between these two genes is in this extra-cellular domain. Whilst the tandem-neck-repeat region remains relatively constant size for DC-SIGN, there is considerable polymorphism for L-SIGN. Homo-oligomerization of the neck region of L-SIGN has been shown to be important for high-affinity ligand binding, and heterozygous expression of the polymorphic variants of L-SIGN in which neck lengths differ could thus affect ligand-binding affinity. Functional studies on the effect of this tandem-neck-repeat region on pathogen-binding, as well as genetic association studies for various infectious diseases and among different populations, are discussed. Worldwide demographic data of the tandem-neck-repeat region showing distinct differences in the neck-region allele and genotype distribution among different ethnic groups are presented. These findings support the neck region as an excellent candidate acting as a functional target for selective pressures exerted by pathogens. © 2008 Springer-Verlag.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/132492
ISSN
2014 Impact Factor: 5.107
2014 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.072
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKhoo, USen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, KYKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, VSFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLin, CLSen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-03-28T09:25:21Z-
dc.date.available2011-03-28T09:25:21Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Molecular Medicine, 2008, v. 86 n. 8, p. 861-874en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0946-2716en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/132492-
dc.description.abstractTwo closely related trans-membrane C-type lectins dendritic cell-specific intracellular adhesion molecules (ICAM)-3 grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN or CD209) and liver/lymph node-specific ICAM-3 grabbing non-integrin (L-SIGN also known as DC-SIGNR, CD209L or CLEC4M) directly recognize a wide range of micro-organisms of major impact on public health. Both genes have long been considered to share similar overall structure and ligand-binding characteristics. This review presents more recent biochemical and structural studies, which show that they have distinct ligand-binding properties and different physiological functions. Of importance in both these genes is the presence of an extra-cellular domain consisting of an extended neck region encoded by tandem repeats that support the carbohydrate-recognition domain, which plays a crucial role in influencing the pathogen-binding properties of these receptors. The notable difference between these two genes is in this extra-cellular domain. Whilst the tandem-neck-repeat region remains relatively constant size for DC-SIGN, there is considerable polymorphism for L-SIGN. Homo-oligomerization of the neck region of L-SIGN has been shown to be important for high-affinity ligand binding, and heterozygous expression of the polymorphic variants of L-SIGN in which neck lengths differ could thus affect ligand-binding affinity. Functional studies on the effect of this tandem-neck-repeat region on pathogen-binding, as well as genetic association studies for various infectious diseases and among different populations, are discussed. Worldwide demographic data of the tandem-neck-repeat region showing distinct differences in the neck-region allele and genotype distribution among different ethnic groups are presented. These findings support the neck region as an excellent candidate acting as a functional target for selective pressures exerted by pathogens. © 2008 Springer-Verlag.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/biomed/molecular/journal/109-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Molecular Medicineen_HK
dc.rightsJournal of Molecular Medicine. Copyright © Elsevier Ireland Ltd.-
dc.subjectAssociation studyen_HK
dc.subjectInfectionen_HK
dc.subjectLectinsen_HK
dc.subjectMolecular geneticsen_HK
dc.subjectPopulation geneticsen_HK
dc.subjectStructural biologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshAlternative Splicingen_HK
dc.subject.meshAmino Acid Sequenceen_HK
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_HK
dc.subject.meshCell Adhesion Molecules - chemistry - genetics - physiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshDendritic Cells - immunologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshDisease Susceptibility - immunologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshInfection - geneticsen_HK
dc.subject.meshLectins, C-Type - chemistry - genetics - physiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshLigandsen_HK
dc.subject.meshModels, Biologicalen_HK
dc.subject.meshMolecular Sequence Dataen_HK
dc.subject.meshProtein Isoforms - chemistry - genetics - metabolismen_HK
dc.subject.meshReceptors, Cell Surface - chemistry - genetics - physiologyen_HK
dc.titleDC-SIGN and L-SIGN: The SIGNs for infectionen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailKhoo, US:uskhoo@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChan, KYK:kelvinc@pathology.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChan, VSF:sfvchan@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityKhoo, US=rp00362en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChan, KYK=rp00453en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChan, VSF=rp01459en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00109-008-0350-2en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid18458800-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-48149094568en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros145272-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-48149094568&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume86en_HK
dc.identifier.issue8en_HK
dc.identifier.spage861en_HK
dc.identifier.epage874en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000257945800002-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKhoo, US=7004195799en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, KYK=7406034195en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, VSF=35200370000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLin, CLS=37099293900en_HK

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