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Conference Paper: Affordable hearing health care needs and initiatives in developing countries
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TitleAffordable hearing health care needs and initiatives in developing countries
 
AuthorsLaperle, N
Marchese, S
Smith, A
McPherson, B
 
Issue Date2010
 
PublisherInternational Society of Audiology.
 
CitationThe 30th International Congress of Audiology (ICA-EIA 2010), São Paulo, Brasi, 28 March-1 April 2010. In Abstract Book of the 30th International Congress of Audiology, 2010, p. 109 [How to Cite?]
 
AbstractFor over fifty years audiology has advanced as a clinical specialty in the developed world. Over recent years there has been a rapid growth in the numbers of audiologists and in the sophistication of audiology assessment techniques and rehabilitation procedures. In developed economies most individuals with hearing impairment now have access to appropriate screening programs, audiological diagnostic assessment, hearing aid fitting and support for their rehabilitation needs. In developing countries however this is not the case. Many children still have undetected hearing loss; many adults with hearing disorders struggle to fulfill their social and economic roles without the benefits that appropriate amplification could bring. At least two-thirds of the 278 million adults and children with significant hearing loss live in nations with less developed economies. Living in such countries, professional help may be scarce and often distant, and assessment equipment and hearing aids or other amplification devices, unaffordable for most of the community. For example, it is estimated that only one million hearing aids are fitted in developing countries each year, when the actual need is for thirty million. There are many concerned individuals and organizations in both developed and developing countries who are now working to change this situation. Increasing attention is being paid to hearing loss in developing countries by international agencies, and professional organizations in the developed world now regularly acknowledge the humanitarian work of their members with awards and grants. Governments, private agencies and individuals in developing nations have commenced programs to detect hearing loss and initiatives to promote affordable hearing devices are now ongoing. At the same time, more audiology professionals and technicians are working in developing countries. An international charitable agency, World Wide Hearing Care for Developing Countries (WWHearing), has emerged as a leading contributor to these initiatives. WWHearing is an initiative founded in 2003 by members of concerned organizations and individuals. In 2006 WWHearing became a charitable association in Switzerland and signed a project collaboration agreement with the World Health Organization. Its mission is to promote and enable better hearing worldwide through the provision of affordable hearing aids and services, especially in under-served areas. In particular, WWHearing aims to (1) build partnerships and networks among those providing hearing health care in developing countries, (2) provide support for hearing health advocacy and national capacity building, (3) coordinate research projects appropriate to a developing country context and disseminate the findings of such research and (4) establish a permanent organizational and administrative structure. To further these aims WWHearing has developed the AUDIO 20/20 initiative—which aims to make prevention, research, education, equipment, training, and advocacy related to hearing loss priorities throughout the developing world. This presentation will give a broad overview of WWHearing’s present and planned contributions hearing health care in developing nations. The aim of the presentation is to give professionals a greater awareness of the issues involved in hearing health care as it relates to developing nations and the key role played by WWHearing.
 
DescriptionPoster Session II - Panel 4
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorLaperle, N
 
dc.contributor.authorMarchese, S
 
dc.contributor.authorSmith, A
 
dc.contributor.authorMcPherson, B
 
dc.date.accessioned2011-03-21T09:04:56Z
 
dc.date.available2011-03-21T09:04:56Z
 
dc.date.issued2010
 
dc.description.abstractFor over fifty years audiology has advanced as a clinical specialty in the developed world. Over recent years there has been a rapid growth in the numbers of audiologists and in the sophistication of audiology assessment techniques and rehabilitation procedures. In developed economies most individuals with hearing impairment now have access to appropriate screening programs, audiological diagnostic assessment, hearing aid fitting and support for their rehabilitation needs. In developing countries however this is not the case. Many children still have undetected hearing loss; many adults with hearing disorders struggle to fulfill their social and economic roles without the benefits that appropriate amplification could bring. At least two-thirds of the 278 million adults and children with significant hearing loss live in nations with less developed economies. Living in such countries, professional help may be scarce and often distant, and assessment equipment and hearing aids or other amplification devices, unaffordable for most of the community. For example, it is estimated that only one million hearing aids are fitted in developing countries each year, when the actual need is for thirty million. There are many concerned individuals and organizations in both developed and developing countries who are now working to change this situation. Increasing attention is being paid to hearing loss in developing countries by international agencies, and professional organizations in the developed world now regularly acknowledge the humanitarian work of their members with awards and grants. Governments, private agencies and individuals in developing nations have commenced programs to detect hearing loss and initiatives to promote affordable hearing devices are now ongoing. At the same time, more audiology professionals and technicians are working in developing countries. An international charitable agency, World Wide Hearing Care for Developing Countries (WWHearing), has emerged as a leading contributor to these initiatives. WWHearing is an initiative founded in 2003 by members of concerned organizations and individuals. In 2006 WWHearing became a charitable association in Switzerland and signed a project collaboration agreement with the World Health Organization. Its mission is to promote and enable better hearing worldwide through the provision of affordable hearing aids and services, especially in under-served areas. In particular, WWHearing aims to (1) build partnerships and networks among those providing hearing health care in developing countries, (2) provide support for hearing health advocacy and national capacity building, (3) coordinate research projects appropriate to a developing country context and disseminate the findings of such research and (4) establish a permanent organizational and administrative structure. To further these aims WWHearing has developed the AUDIO 20/20 initiative—which aims to make prevention, research, education, equipment, training, and advocacy related to hearing loss priorities throughout the developing world. This presentation will give a broad overview of WWHearing’s present and planned contributions hearing health care in developing nations. The aim of the presentation is to give professionals a greater awareness of the issues involved in hearing health care as it relates to developing nations and the key role played by WWHearing.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext
 
dc.descriptionPoster Session II - Panel 4
 
dc.description.otherThe 30th International Congress of Audiology (ICA-EIA 2010), São Paulo, Brasi, 28 March-1 April 2010. In Abstract Book of the 30th International Congress of Audiology, 2010, p. 109
 
dc.identifier.citationThe 30th International Congress of Audiology (ICA-EIA 2010), São Paulo, Brasi, 28 March-1 April 2010. In Abstract Book of the 30th International Congress of Audiology, 2010, p. 109 [How to Cite?]
 
dc.identifier.epage109
 
dc.identifier.hkuros176470
 
dc.identifier.spage109
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/132257
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherInternational Society of Audiology.
 
dc.publisher.placeBrazil
 
dc.relation.ispartofAbstract Book of the 30th International Congress of Audiology
 
dc.titleAffordable hearing health care needs and initiatives in developing countries
 
dc.typeConference_Paper
 
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<description.abstract>For over fifty years audiology has advanced as a clinical specialty in the developed world. Over recent years there has been a rapid growth in the numbers of audiologists and in the sophistication of audiology assessment techniques and rehabilitation procedures. In developed economies most individuals with hearing impairment now have access to appropriate screening programs, audiological diagnostic assessment, hearing aid fitting and support for their rehabilitation needs. In developing countries however this is not the case. Many children still have undetected hearing loss; many adults with hearing disorders struggle to fulfill their social and economic roles without the benefits that appropriate amplification could bring. At least two-thirds of the 278 million adults and children with significant hearing loss live in nations with less developed economies. Living in such countries, professional help may be scarce and often distant, and assessment equipment and hearing aids or other amplification devices, unaffordable for most of the community. For example, it is estimated that only one million hearing aids are fitted in developing countries each year, when the actual need is for thirty million. There are many concerned individuals and organizations in both developed and developing countries who are now working to change this situation. Increasing attention is being paid to hearing loss in developing countries by international agencies, and professional organizations in the developed world now regularly acknowledge the humanitarian work of their members with awards and grants. Governments, private agencies and individuals in developing nations have commenced programs to detect hearing loss and initiatives to promote affordable hearing devices are now ongoing. At the same time, more audiology professionals and technicians are working in developing countries. An international charitable agency, World Wide Hearing Care for Developing Countries (WWHearing), has emerged as a leading contributor to these initiatives. WWHearing is an initiative founded in 2003 by members of concerned organizations and individuals. In 2006 WWHearing became a charitable association in Switzerland and signed a project collaboration agreement with the World Health Organization. Its mission is to promote and enable better hearing worldwide through the provision of affordable hearing aids and services, especially in under-served areas. In particular, WWHearing aims to (1) build partnerships and networks among those providing hearing health care in developing countries, (2) provide support for hearing health advocacy and national capacity building, (3) coordinate research projects appropriate to a developing country context and disseminate the findings of such research and (4) establish a permanent organizational and administrative structure. To further these aims WWHearing has developed the AUDIO 20/20 initiative&#8212;which aims to make prevention, research, education, equipment, training, and advocacy related to hearing loss priorities throughout the developing world. This presentation will give a broad overview of WWHearing&#8217;s present and planned contributions hearing health care in developing nations. The aim of the presentation is to give professionals a greater awareness of the issues involved in hearing health care as it relates to developing nations and the key role played by WWHearing.</description.abstract>
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