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Article: What do they mean? Questions in academic writing

TitleWhat do they mean? Questions in academic writing
Authors
KeywordsAcademic discourse
Dialogic writing
Disciplinary interaction
Questions
Issue Date2002
Citation
Text, 2002, v. 22 n. 4, p. 529-557 How to Cite?
AbstractAcademic writing is governed by questioning. Papers are written with questions in mind or problems to solve, and occasionally these emerge as explicit interrogatives. But while they exploit the interactivity of more familiar conversational discourses, questions in academic writing perform rhetorical functions which differ considerably from them. In this article I explore the distribution and use of questions through an analysis of a 1.8-million-word corpus of research articles, textbooks and L2 student essays, and through interviews with insider informants on their perceptions and practices. The analysis shows that questions underline the essentially dialogic nature of academic writing as they allow writers to invoke explicitly the involvemnent of their readers in the discourse, addressing the perceptions, interests, and needs of a potential audience. It also reveals that while questions are frequently used to express writers' purposes, organize texts, evaluate argumnents, and set up claims, the distribution of these functions differs across disciplines and genres and crucially depends on participants' perceptions of rhetorical context. © Walter de Gruyter.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/130174
ISSN
2007 Impact Factor: 0.423
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHyland, Ken_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-12-23T08:47:36Z-
dc.date.available2010-12-23T08:47:36Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_HK
dc.identifier.citationText, 2002, v. 22 n. 4, p. 529-557en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0165-4888en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/130174-
dc.description.abstractAcademic writing is governed by questioning. Papers are written with questions in mind or problems to solve, and occasionally these emerge as explicit interrogatives. But while they exploit the interactivity of more familiar conversational discourses, questions in academic writing perform rhetorical functions which differ considerably from them. In this article I explore the distribution and use of questions through an analysis of a 1.8-million-word corpus of research articles, textbooks and L2 student essays, and through interviews with insider informants on their perceptions and practices. The analysis shows that questions underline the essentially dialogic nature of academic writing as they allow writers to invoke explicitly the involvemnent of their readers in the discourse, addressing the perceptions, interests, and needs of a potential audience. It also reveals that while questions are frequently used to express writers' purposes, organize texts, evaluate argumnents, and set up claims, the distribution of these functions differs across disciplines and genres and crucially depends on participants' perceptions of rhetorical context. © Walter de Gruyter.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofTexten_HK
dc.subjectAcademic discourseen_HK
dc.subjectDialogic writingen_HK
dc.subjectDisciplinary interactionen_HK
dc.subjectQuestionsen_HK
dc.titleWhat do they mean? Questions in academic writingen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailHyland, K:khyland@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHyland, K=rp01133en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-10244248856en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-10244248856&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume22en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage529en_HK
dc.identifier.epage557en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1860-7349-

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