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Article: Writing in the disciplines: research evidence for specificity

TitleWriting in the disciplines: research evidence for specificity
Authors
KeywordsAcademic writing
Conventions
Discourse analysis
Genres
Issue Date2009
PublisherTaiwan ESP Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tespa.org.tw/publications.html
Citation
Taiwan International ESP Journal, 2009, v. 1 n. 1, p. 5-22 How to Cite?
AbstractAcademic writing, much like any other kind of writing, is only effective when writers use conventions that other members of their community find familiar and convincing. Essentially the process of writing involves creating a text that we assume the reader will recognise and expect, and the process of reading involves drawing on assumptions about what the writer is trying to do. It is this writer-reader coordination which enables the co-construction of coherence from a text. Scholars and students alike must therefore attempt to use conventions that other members of their discipline, whether journal editors and reviewers or subject specialist teachers and examiners, will recognise and accept. Because of this discourse analysis has become a central tool for identifying the specific language features of target groups. In this paper I draw on my own work, conducted over several years into research and student genres, to show how some familiar conventions of academic writing are used in different disciplines and what these differences can tell us about the work in the disciplines themselves.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/130168
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHyland, KLen_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-12-23T08:47:35Z-
dc.date.available2010-12-23T08:47:35Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.citationTaiwan International ESP Journal, 2009, v. 1 n. 1, p. 5-22en_US
dc.identifier.issn2079-7761-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/130168-
dc.description.abstractAcademic writing, much like any other kind of writing, is only effective when writers use conventions that other members of their community find familiar and convincing. Essentially the process of writing involves creating a text that we assume the reader will recognise and expect, and the process of reading involves drawing on assumptions about what the writer is trying to do. It is this writer-reader coordination which enables the co-construction of coherence from a text. Scholars and students alike must therefore attempt to use conventions that other members of their discipline, whether journal editors and reviewers or subject specialist teachers and examiners, will recognise and accept. Because of this discourse analysis has become a central tool for identifying the specific language features of target groups. In this paper I draw on my own work, conducted over several years into research and student genres, to show how some familiar conventions of academic writing are used in different disciplines and what these differences can tell us about the work in the disciplines themselves.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherTaiwan ESP Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tespa.org.tw/publications.html-
dc.relation.ispartofTaiwan International ESP Journalen_US
dc.subjectAcademic writing-
dc.subjectConventions-
dc.subjectDiscourse analysis-
dc.subjectGenres-
dc.titleWriting in the disciplines: research evidence for specificityen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=2079-7761&volume=1&issue=1&spage=5&epage=22&date=2009&atitle=Writing+in+the+disciplines:+research+evidence+for+specificity-
dc.identifier.emailHyland, KL: khyland@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHyland, KL=rp01133en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.hkuros177326en_US
dc.identifier.volume1en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage5en_US
dc.identifier.epage22en_US

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