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Article: Persuasion and context: The pragmatics of academic metadiscourse

TitlePersuasion and context: The pragmatics of academic metadiscourse
Authors
Issue Date1998
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/pragma
Citation
Journal Of Pragmatics, 1998, v. 30 n. 4, p. 437-455 How to Cite?
AbstractMetadiscourse refers to aspects of a text which explicitly organise the discourse, engage the audience and signal the writer's attitude. Its use by writers to guide readers and display an appropriate professional persona is an important aspect of persuasive writing. Its role in establishing and maintaining contact between the writer and the reader and between the writer and the message also makes it a central pragmatic concept. Based on a textual analysis of 28 research articles in four academic disciplines, this paper seeks to show how the appropriate use of metadiscourse crucially depends on rhetorical context. The study identifies a taxonomy of metadiscourse functions and suggests that metadiscourse reflects one way in which context and linguistic meaning are integrated to allow readers to derive intended interpretations. It is argued that metadiscourse provides writers with a means of constructing appropriate contexts and alluding to shared disciplinary assumptions. The study of academic metadiscourse can therefore offer insights into our understanding of this concept and illuminate an important dimension of rhetorical variation among disciplinary communities.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/130164
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.118
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.153
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHyland, Ken_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-12-23T08:47:34Z-
dc.date.available2010-12-23T08:47:34Z-
dc.date.issued1998en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Pragmatics, 1998, v. 30 n. 4, p. 437-455en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0378-2166en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/130164-
dc.description.abstractMetadiscourse refers to aspects of a text which explicitly organise the discourse, engage the audience and signal the writer's attitude. Its use by writers to guide readers and display an appropriate professional persona is an important aspect of persuasive writing. Its role in establishing and maintaining contact between the writer and the reader and between the writer and the message also makes it a central pragmatic concept. Based on a textual analysis of 28 research articles in four academic disciplines, this paper seeks to show how the appropriate use of metadiscourse crucially depends on rhetorical context. The study identifies a taxonomy of metadiscourse functions and suggests that metadiscourse reflects one way in which context and linguistic meaning are integrated to allow readers to derive intended interpretations. It is argued that metadiscourse provides writers with a means of constructing appropriate contexts and alluding to shared disciplinary assumptions. The study of academic metadiscourse can therefore offer insights into our understanding of this concept and illuminate an important dimension of rhetorical variation among disciplinary communities.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/pragmaen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Pragmaticsen_HK
dc.titlePersuasion and context: The pragmatics of academic metadiscourseen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailHyland, K:khyland@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHyland, K=rp01133en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0032186985en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0032186985&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume30en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage437en_HK
dc.identifier.epage455en_HK
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_HK

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