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Article: Academic lexis and disciplinary practice: corpus evidence for specificity
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TitleAcademic lexis and disciplinary practice: corpus evidence for specificity
 
AuthorsHyland, KL
Tse, P
 
KeywordsAcademic Word List
Vocabulary
Lexical bundles
Disciplinary writing
Specificity
 
Issue Date2009
 
PublisherUniversidad de Murcia, Servicio de Publicaciones. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.um.es/ijes/
 
CitationInternational Journal of English Studies, 2009, v. 9 n. 2, p. 111-129 [How to Cite?]
 
AbstractThe presence of unfamiliar words and expressions in academic texts is a serious obstacle to students reading in a second language. EAP has responded to this challenge by taking the view that there is a common core of academic vocabulary which is frequent across an academic register. This paper briefly considers this view by examining the range, frequency, collocation, and meaning of items on the Academic Word List (AWL) in a large multidisciplinary corpus. Our corpus analysis shows that individual lexical items on the list often occur and behave in different ways across disciplines and that words commonly contribute to 'lexical bundles' which also reflect disciplinary preferences. Our findings question the widely held assumption that there is a single core vocabulary needed for academic study and suggests that teachers should assist students towards developing a more restricted, disciplinary-based lexical repertoire.
 
Descriptionhttp://dialnet.unirioja.es/servlet/articulo?codigo=3104270
Open Access Journal
 
ISSN1578-7044
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorHyland, KL
 
dc.contributor.authorTse, P
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-12-23T08:47:32Z
 
dc.date.available2010-12-23T08:47:32Z
 
dc.date.issued2009
 
dc.description.abstractThe presence of unfamiliar words and expressions in academic texts is a serious obstacle to students reading in a second language. EAP has responded to this challenge by taking the view that there is a common core of academic vocabulary which is frequent across an academic register. This paper briefly considers this view by examining the range, frequency, collocation, and meaning of items on the Academic Word List (AWL) in a large multidisciplinary corpus. Our corpus analysis shows that individual lexical items on the list often occur and behave in different ways across disciplines and that words commonly contribute to 'lexical bundles' which also reflect disciplinary preferences. Our findings question the widely held assumption that there is a single core vocabulary needed for academic study and suggests that teachers should assist students towards developing a more restricted, disciplinary-based lexical repertoire.
 
dc.descriptionhttp://dialnet.unirioja.es/servlet/articulo?codigo=3104270
 
dc.descriptionOpen Access Journal
 
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal of English Studies, 2009, v. 9 n. 2, p. 111-129 [How to Cite?]
 
dc.identifier.epage129
 
dc.identifier.hkuros177321
 
dc.identifier.issn1578-7044
 
dc.identifier.issue2
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.spage111
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/130152
 
dc.identifier.volume9
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherUniversidad de Murcia, Servicio de Publicaciones. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.um.es/ijes/
 
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of English Studies
 
dc.subjectAcademic Word List
 
dc.subjectVocabulary
 
dc.subjectLexical bundles
 
dc.subjectDisciplinary writing
 
dc.subjectSpecificity
 
dc.titleAcademic lexis and disciplinary practice: corpus evidence for specificity
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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