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Article: Directives: Argument and Engagement in Academic Writing

TitleDirectives: Argument and Engagement in Academic Writing
Authors
Issue Date2002
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://applij.oxfordjournals.org/
Citation
Applied Linguistics, 2002, v. 23 n. 2, p. 215-239+280 How to Cite?
AbstractSuccessful academic writing involves both clear exposition and appropriate audience relationships, but the use of directives potentially undermines the harmony of such relationships. Because they instruct the reader to perform an action or to see things in a way determined by the writer, directives are potentially risky devices which are often regarded as bald-on-record threats to face (Brown and Levinson 1987). The widespread use of this feature in academic writing however suggests a more complex rhetorical picture. In this paper I explore the use of directives through an analysis of a 2.5 million word corpus of published articles, textbooks, and L2 student essays, and through interviews with insider informants on their perceptions and practices. The study reveals that directives are used for very different strategic purposes and indicates considerable variations in the ways they are employed across genres and disciplines. The weight of imposition carried by directives crucially depends on these purposes and participants' perceptions of rhetorical context.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/130143
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.25
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.749
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHyland, Ken_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-12-23T08:47:31Z-
dc.date.available2010-12-23T08:47:31Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_HK
dc.identifier.citationApplied Linguistics, 2002, v. 23 n. 2, p. 215-239+280en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0142-6001en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/130143-
dc.description.abstractSuccessful academic writing involves both clear exposition and appropriate audience relationships, but the use of directives potentially undermines the harmony of such relationships. Because they instruct the reader to perform an action or to see things in a way determined by the writer, directives are potentially risky devices which are often regarded as bald-on-record threats to face (Brown and Levinson 1987). The widespread use of this feature in academic writing however suggests a more complex rhetorical picture. In this paper I explore the use of directives through an analysis of a 2.5 million word corpus of published articles, textbooks, and L2 student essays, and through interviews with insider informants on their perceptions and practices. The study reveals that directives are used for very different strategic purposes and indicates considerable variations in the ways they are employed across genres and disciplines. The weight of imposition carried by directives crucially depends on these purposes and participants' perceptions of rhetorical context.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://applij.oxfordjournals.org/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofApplied Linguisticsen_HK
dc.titleDirectives: Argument and Engagement in Academic Writingen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailHyland, K:khyland@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHyland, K=rp01133en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/applin/23.2.215en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0345447552en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0345447552&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume23en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage215en_HK
dc.identifier.epage239+280en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000175892600004-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike2694153-

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