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Article: 'Robot Kung fu': Gender and professional identity in biology and philosophy reviews
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Title'Robot Kung fu': Gender and professional identity in biology and philosophy reviews
 
AuthorsTse, P1
Hyland, K2
 
KeywordsAcademic writing
Book reviews
Disciplinary discourses
Gender
Identity
 
Issue Date2008
 
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/pragma
 
CitationJournal Of Pragmatics, 2008, v. 40 n. 7, p. 1232-1248 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pragma.2007.02.002
 
AbstractIn academic writing the construction of an authorial identity is constrained by different social, biographical and academic factors as writers bring their diverse personal experiences to a text. One of these factors is that of gender, although this has been far less studied in published academic writing than in other forms of social interaction. In this paper, we explore the issue of gender in academic interactions by analyzing a corpus of academic book reviews and interviews with academics from Philosophy and Biology. Focusing on metadiscourse features, we examine the similarities and differences in the rhetorical practices of male and female academics in their construction of a disciplinarily appropriate identity. Our findings show while there is no one-to-one relation between gender and language, gender and discipline identities cross-cut each other in significant ways in the context of professional self-conception and personal preferences. © 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
 
ISSN0378-2166
2012 Impact Factor: 0.7
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.638
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pragma.2007.02.002
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000257042800005
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorTse, P
 
dc.contributor.authorHyland, K
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-12-23T08:47:30Z
 
dc.date.available2010-12-23T08:47:30Z
 
dc.date.issued2008
 
dc.description.abstractIn academic writing the construction of an authorial identity is constrained by different social, biographical and academic factors as writers bring their diverse personal experiences to a text. One of these factors is that of gender, although this has been far less studied in published academic writing than in other forms of social interaction. In this paper, we explore the issue of gender in academic interactions by analyzing a corpus of academic book reviews and interviews with academics from Philosophy and Biology. Focusing on metadiscourse features, we examine the similarities and differences in the rhetorical practices of male and female academics in their construction of a disciplinarily appropriate identity. Our findings show while there is no one-to-one relation between gender and language, gender and discipline identities cross-cut each other in significant ways in the context of professional self-conception and personal preferences. © 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Pragmatics, 2008, v. 40 n. 7, p. 1232-1248 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pragma.2007.02.002
 
dc.identifier.citeulike5445640
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pragma.2007.02.002
 
dc.identifier.epage1248
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000257042800005
 
dc.identifier.issn0378-2166
2012 Impact Factor: 0.7
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.638
 
dc.identifier.issue7
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-43849100414
 
dc.identifier.spage1232
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/130135
 
dc.identifier.volume40
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/pragma
 
dc.publisher.placeNetherlands
 
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Pragmatics
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subjectAcademic writing
 
dc.subjectBook reviews
 
dc.subjectDisciplinary discourses
 
dc.subjectGender
 
dc.subjectIdentity
 
dc.title'Robot Kung fu': Gender and professional identity in biology and philosophy reviews
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. Hong Kong University of Science and Technology
  2. University of London, Institute of Education