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Article: Boosting, hedging and the negotiation of academic knowledge

TitleBoosting, hedging and the negotiation of academic knowledge
Authors
KeywordsAcademic writing
Discourse analysis
Hedges and boosters
Social construction.
Issue Date1998
Citation
Text, 1998, v. 18 n. 3, p. 349-382 How to Cite?
AbstractThis article explores the role of doubt and certainty in published research articles from eight academic disciplines. Drawing on a computer corpus of 56 research papers and interviews with expert informants, I identify the principal means by which academics modify their statements and the functions such modifications perform in negotiating knowledge claims in a range of areas of intellectual inquiry. The quantitative results reveal the importance of hedges and boosters in academic writing and their wide disciplinary variability. The analysis shows that these devices are responsive to the understandings of social communities, and that their use is one of the systematic means by which academics collabora]te to both socially create knowledge and construct their disciplinary worlds. The paper therefore suggests that these differences in rhetorical practices are related to the fact that academics construct knowledge as members of particular disciplinary communities and that their discoursal decisions are influenced by, and embedded in, the epistemological and interactional conventions of their disciplines. © Walter de Gruyter.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/130127
ISSN
2007 Impact Factor: 0.423
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHyland, Ken_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-12-23T08:47:29Z-
dc.date.available2010-12-23T08:47:29Z-
dc.date.issued1998en_HK
dc.identifier.citationText, 1998, v. 18 n. 3, p. 349-382en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0165-4888en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/130127-
dc.description.abstractThis article explores the role of doubt and certainty in published research articles from eight academic disciplines. Drawing on a computer corpus of 56 research papers and interviews with expert informants, I identify the principal means by which academics modify their statements and the functions such modifications perform in negotiating knowledge claims in a range of areas of intellectual inquiry. The quantitative results reveal the importance of hedges and boosters in academic writing and their wide disciplinary variability. The analysis shows that these devices are responsive to the understandings of social communities, and that their use is one of the systematic means by which academics collabora]te to both socially create knowledge and construct their disciplinary worlds. The paper therefore suggests that these differences in rhetorical practices are related to the fact that academics construct knowledge as members of particular disciplinary communities and that their discoursal decisions are influenced by, and embedded in, the epistemological and interactional conventions of their disciplines. © Walter de Gruyter.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofTexten_HK
dc.subjectAcademic writingen_HK
dc.subjectDiscourse analysisen_HK
dc.subjectHedges and boostersen_HK
dc.subjectSocial construction.en_HK
dc.titleBoosting, hedging and the negotiation of academic knowledgeen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailHyland, K:khyland@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHyland, K=rp01133en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-1542490942en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-1542490942&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume18en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage349en_HK
dc.identifier.epage382en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1860-7349-

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