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Article: Representing readers in writing: Student and expert practices

TitleRepresenting readers in writing: Student and expert practices
Authors
KeywordsAcademic writing
Discourse analysis
Engagement
Genre
Second language writing
Issue Date2005
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/linged
Citation
Linguistics And Education, 2005, v. 16 n. 4, p. 363-377 How to Cite?
AbstractThe importance of establishing a connection with readers in academic writing is now widely acknowledged. The growing literature on this topic, however, has largely concentrated on published 'expert' texts and on the ways that writers use language to project their stance or identity. In contrast, this paper will focus on strategies which writers use to represent their readers rather than themselves, using language to structure and negotiate relationships with their addressees. Using a framework of 'engagement' (Hyland, K. (2001). Bringing in the reader: Addressee features in academic writing. Written Communication, 18(4), 549-574; Hyland, K. (2005a). Stance and engagement: A model of interaction in academic discourse. Discourse Studies, 7(2), 173-191), the paper examines a corpus of 64 project reports (650,000 words) written by final year Hong Kong undergraduates together with transcripts of interviews with students. The work sets out to explore how writers seek to explicitly establish the presence of their readers in this genre and to compare these with the practices of professional academics in research papers, going on to show how the different purposes of these writers influence the construction of the reader in the text. The analysis contributes to our understanding of audience engagement and the dialogic nature of persuasion in academic argument, but also suggests how students understand their readers and express these understandings in writing. © 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/130122
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.077
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.669
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHyland, Ken_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-12-23T08:47:28Z-
dc.date.available2010-12-23T08:47:28Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_HK
dc.identifier.citationLinguistics And Education, 2005, v. 16 n. 4, p. 363-377en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0898-5898en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/130122-
dc.description.abstractThe importance of establishing a connection with readers in academic writing is now widely acknowledged. The growing literature on this topic, however, has largely concentrated on published 'expert' texts and on the ways that writers use language to project their stance or identity. In contrast, this paper will focus on strategies which writers use to represent their readers rather than themselves, using language to structure and negotiate relationships with their addressees. Using a framework of 'engagement' (Hyland, K. (2001). Bringing in the reader: Addressee features in academic writing. Written Communication, 18(4), 549-574; Hyland, K. (2005a). Stance and engagement: A model of interaction in academic discourse. Discourse Studies, 7(2), 173-191), the paper examines a corpus of 64 project reports (650,000 words) written by final year Hong Kong undergraduates together with transcripts of interviews with students. The work sets out to explore how writers seek to explicitly establish the presence of their readers in this genre and to compare these with the practices of professional academics in research papers, going on to show how the different purposes of these writers influence the construction of the reader in the text. The analysis contributes to our understanding of audience engagement and the dialogic nature of persuasion in academic argument, but also suggests how students understand their readers and express these understandings in writing. © 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/lingeden_HK
dc.relation.ispartofLinguistics and Educationen_HK
dc.subjectAcademic writingen_HK
dc.subjectDiscourse analysisen_HK
dc.subjectEngagementen_HK
dc.subjectGenreen_HK
dc.subjectSecond language writingen_HK
dc.titleRepresenting readers in writing: Student and expert practicesen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailHyland, K:khyland@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHyland, K=rp01133en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.linged.2006.05.002en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33748145111en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33748145111&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume16en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage363en_HK
dc.identifier.epage377en_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike5445647-

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