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Article: Talking to Students: Metadiscourse in Introductory Coursebooks
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TitleTalking to Students: Metadiscourse in Introductory Coursebooks
 
AuthorsHyland, K1
 
Issue Date1999
 
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/esp
 
CitationEnglish For Specific Purposes, 1999, v. 18 n. 1, p. 3-26 [How to Cite?]
 
AbstractThis paper explores the possible role of university textbooks in students' acquisition of a specialised disciplinary literacy, focusing on the use of metadiscourse as a manifestation of the writer's linguistic and rhetorical presence in a text. Because metadiscourse can be analysed independently of propositional matter, it provides useful information about how writers support their arguments and build a relationship with readers in different rhetorical contexts. The paper compares features in extracts from 21 textbooks in microbiology, marketing and applied linguistics with a similar corpus of research articles and shows that the ways textbook authors represent themselves, organise their arguments, and signal their attitudes to both their statements and their readers differ markedly in the two corpora. It is suggested that these differences mean that textbooks provide limited rhetorical guidance to students seeking information from research sources or learning appropriate forms of written argument. Finally, by investigating metadiscourse in particular disciplines and genres, the study helps to restore the intrinsic link between metadiscourse and its associated rhetorical contexts and rectify a popular view which implicitly characterises it as an independent stylistic device. © 1998 The American University. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.
 
ISSN0889-4906
2013 Impact Factor: 0.953
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.301
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorHyland, K
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-12-23T08:47:28Z
 
dc.date.available2010-12-23T08:47:28Z
 
dc.date.issued1999
 
dc.description.abstractThis paper explores the possible role of university textbooks in students' acquisition of a specialised disciplinary literacy, focusing on the use of metadiscourse as a manifestation of the writer's linguistic and rhetorical presence in a text. Because metadiscourse can be analysed independently of propositional matter, it provides useful information about how writers support their arguments and build a relationship with readers in different rhetorical contexts. The paper compares features in extracts from 21 textbooks in microbiology, marketing and applied linguistics with a similar corpus of research articles and shows that the ways textbook authors represent themselves, organise their arguments, and signal their attitudes to both their statements and their readers differ markedly in the two corpora. It is suggested that these differences mean that textbooks provide limited rhetorical guidance to students seeking information from research sources or learning appropriate forms of written argument. Finally, by investigating metadiscourse in particular disciplines and genres, the study helps to restore the intrinsic link between metadiscourse and its associated rhetorical contexts and rectify a popular view which implicitly characterises it as an independent stylistic device. © 1998 The American University. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationEnglish For Specific Purposes, 1999, v. 18 n. 1, p. 3-26 [How to Cite?]
 
dc.identifier.epage26
 
dc.identifier.issn0889-4906
2013 Impact Factor: 0.953
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.301
 
dc.identifier.issue1
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0347807681
 
dc.identifier.spage3
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/130121
 
dc.identifier.volume18
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/esp
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofEnglish for Specific Purposes
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.titleTalking to Students: Metadiscourse in Introductory Coursebooks
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. City University of Hong Kong