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Article: Community psychological and behavioral responses through the first wave of the 2009 influenza A(H1N1) pandemic in Hong Kong
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TitleCommunity psychological and behavioral responses through the first wave of the 2009 influenza A(H1N1) pandemic in Hong Kong
 
AuthorsCowling, BJ1
Ng, DMW1
Ip, DKM1
Liao, Q1
Lam, WWT1
Wu, JT1
Lau, JTF2
Griffiths, SM2
Fielding, R1
 
Issue Date2010
 
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://jid.oxfordjournals.org
 
CitationJournal Of Infectious Diseases, 2010, v. 202 n. 6, p. 867-876 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/655811
 
AbstractBackground: Little is known about the community psychological and behavioral responses to influenza pandemics. Methods: Using random digit dialing, we sampled 12,965 Hong Kong residents in 13 cross-sectional telephone surveys between April and November 2009, covering the entire first wave of the 2009 influenza A(H1N1) pandemic. We examined trends in anxiety, risk perception, knowledge on modes of transmission, and preventive behaviors. Results: Respondents reported low anxiety levels throughout the epidemic. Perceived susceptibility to infection and perceived severity of H1N1 were initially high but declined early in the epidemic and remained stable thereafter. As the epidemic grew, knowledge on modes of transmission did not improve, the adoption of hygiene measures and use of face masks did not change, and social distancing declined. Greater anxiety was associated with lower reported use of hygiene measures but greater social distancing. Knowledge that H1N1 could be spread by indirect contact was associated with greater use of hygiene measures and social distancing. Conclusions: The lack of substantial change in preventive measures or knowledge about the modes of H1N1 transmission in the general population suggests that community mitigation measures played little role in mitigating the impact of the first wave of 2009 influenza A(H1N1) pandemic in Hong Kong. © 2010 by the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved.
 
ISSN0022-1899
2012 Impact Factor: 5.848
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.723
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1086/655811
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000281091200007
Funding AgencyGrant Number
MedImmune Inc.
Control of Infectious Disease, Food and Health Bureau
Government of the Hong Kong Special Administrative RegionPHE-01
Area of Excellence Scheme of the Hong Kong University Grants CommitteeAoE/M-12/06
Funding Information:

B.J.C. received funding from MedImmune Inc., a manufacturer of influenza vaccines. All other authors declare no conflict of interest.

 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
GrantsControl of Pandemic and Inter-pandemic Influenza
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorCowling, BJ
 
dc.contributor.authorNg, DMW
 
dc.contributor.authorIp, DKM
 
dc.contributor.authorLiao, Q
 
dc.contributor.authorLam, WWT
 
dc.contributor.authorWu, JT
 
dc.contributor.authorLau, JTF
 
dc.contributor.authorGriffiths, SM
 
dc.contributor.authorFielding, R
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-12-23T08:37:35Z
 
dc.date.available2010-12-23T08:37:35Z
 
dc.date.issued2010
 
dc.description.abstractBackground: Little is known about the community psychological and behavioral responses to influenza pandemics. Methods: Using random digit dialing, we sampled 12,965 Hong Kong residents in 13 cross-sectional telephone surveys between April and November 2009, covering the entire first wave of the 2009 influenza A(H1N1) pandemic. We examined trends in anxiety, risk perception, knowledge on modes of transmission, and preventive behaviors. Results: Respondents reported low anxiety levels throughout the epidemic. Perceived susceptibility to infection and perceived severity of H1N1 were initially high but declined early in the epidemic and remained stable thereafter. As the epidemic grew, knowledge on modes of transmission did not improve, the adoption of hygiene measures and use of face masks did not change, and social distancing declined. Greater anxiety was associated with lower reported use of hygiene measures but greater social distancing. Knowledge that H1N1 could be spread by indirect contact was associated with greater use of hygiene measures and social distancing. Conclusions: The lack of substantial change in preventive measures or knowledge about the modes of H1N1 transmission in the general population suggests that community mitigation measures played little role in mitigating the impact of the first wave of 2009 influenza A(H1N1) pandemic in Hong Kong. © 2010 by the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved.
 
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version
 
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Infectious Diseases, 2010, v. 202 n. 6, p. 867-876 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/655811
 
dc.identifier.citeulike7611634
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1086/655811
 
dc.identifier.eissn1537-6613
 
dc.identifier.epage876
 
dc.identifier.hkuros177649
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000281091200007
Funding AgencyGrant Number
MedImmune Inc.
Control of Infectious Disease, Food and Health Bureau
Government of the Hong Kong Special Administrative RegionPHE-01
Area of Excellence Scheme of the Hong Kong University Grants CommitteeAoE/M-12/06
Funding Information:

B.J.C. received funding from MedImmune Inc., a manufacturer of influenza vaccines. All other authors declare no conflict of interest.

 
dc.identifier.issn0022-1899
2012 Impact Factor: 5.848
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.723
 
dc.identifier.issue6
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmid20677945
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77955956691
 
dc.identifier.spage867
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/129455
 
dc.identifier.volume202
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://jid.oxfordjournals.org
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Infectious Diseases
 
dc.relation.projectControl of Pandemic and Inter-pandemic Influenza
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License
 
dc.subject.meshBehavior
 
dc.subject.meshDisease Outbreaks
 
dc.subject.meshHealth Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
 
dc.subject.meshInfluenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - isolation and purification
 
dc.subject.meshInfluenza, Human - epidemiology - prevention and control - psychology - virology
 
dc.titleCommunity psychological and behavioral responses through the first wave of the 2009 influenza A(H1N1) pandemic in Hong Kong
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine
  2. Prince of Wales Hospital Hong Kong