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Article: Neuroimaging techniques in epilepsy

TitleNeuroimaging techniques in epilepsy
Authors
KeywordsEmission-computed
Fluorodeoxyglucose F18
Magnetic resonance imaging
Magnetic resonance spectroscopy
Positron-emission tomography
Single-photon
Tomography
Issue Date2010
PublisherHong Kong Medical Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkmj.org/resources/supp.html
Citation
Hong Kong Medical Journal, 2010, v. 16 n. 4, p. 292-298 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: To review state-of-the-art neuroimaging modalities in epilepsy and their clinical applications. Data sources and study selection: PubMed literature searches to March 2010, using the following key words: 'epilepsy', 'positron emission tomography (PET)', 'single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)', 'MR volumetry', 'diffusion tensor imaging', and 'functional MR imaging'. Data extraction All articles including neuroimaging techniques in epilepsy were included in the review. Data synthesis High-field magnetic resonance imaging is fundamental for high-resolution structural imaging. Functional radionuclide imaging (positron emission tomography/single-photon emission computed tomography) can provide additional information to improve overall accuracy, and show good results with high concordance rates in temporal lobe epilepsy. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy is a useful adjunct consistently demonstrating changing metabolites in the epileptogenic region. Magnetic resonance volumetric imaging shows excellent sensitivity and specificity for temporal lobe epilepsy but thus far it has been inconsistent for extratemporal epilepsy. Diffusion tensor imaging with tractography allows visualisation of specific tracts such as connections with the language and visual cortex to enhance preoperative evaluation. Functional magnetic resonance imaging using blood oxygen level-dependent activation techniques is mainly used in presurgical planning for the high-sensitivity mapping of the eloquent cortex. Both contrast-bolus and arterial spin labelling magnetic resonance perfusion imaging show good correlation with clinical lateralisation of seizure disorder. Conclusion Structural imaging is essential in localisation and lateralization of the seizure focus. Functional radionuclide imaging or advanced magnetic resonance imaging techniques can provide complementary information when an epileptogenic substrate is not identified or in the presence of non-concordant clinical and structural findings.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/129148
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.887
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.279
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLai, Ven_HK
dc.contributor.authorMak, HKFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYung, AWYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHo, WYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHung, KNen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-12-23T08:33:02Z-
dc.date.available2010-12-23T08:33:02Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationHong Kong Medical Journal, 2010, v. 16 n. 4, p. 292-298en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1024-2708en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/129148-
dc.description.abstractObjective: To review state-of-the-art neuroimaging modalities in epilepsy and their clinical applications. Data sources and study selection: PubMed literature searches to March 2010, using the following key words: 'epilepsy', 'positron emission tomography (PET)', 'single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)', 'MR volumetry', 'diffusion tensor imaging', and 'functional MR imaging'. Data extraction All articles including neuroimaging techniques in epilepsy were included in the review. Data synthesis High-field magnetic resonance imaging is fundamental for high-resolution structural imaging. Functional radionuclide imaging (positron emission tomography/single-photon emission computed tomography) can provide additional information to improve overall accuracy, and show good results with high concordance rates in temporal lobe epilepsy. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy is a useful adjunct consistently demonstrating changing metabolites in the epileptogenic region. Magnetic resonance volumetric imaging shows excellent sensitivity and specificity for temporal lobe epilepsy but thus far it has been inconsistent for extratemporal epilepsy. Diffusion tensor imaging with tractography allows visualisation of specific tracts such as connections with the language and visual cortex to enhance preoperative evaluation. Functional magnetic resonance imaging using blood oxygen level-dependent activation techniques is mainly used in presurgical planning for the high-sensitivity mapping of the eloquent cortex. Both contrast-bolus and arterial spin labelling magnetic resonance perfusion imaging show good correlation with clinical lateralisation of seizure disorder. Conclusion Structural imaging is essential in localisation and lateralization of the seizure focus. Functional radionuclide imaging or advanced magnetic resonance imaging techniques can provide complementary information when an epileptogenic substrate is not identified or in the presence of non-concordant clinical and structural findings.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherHong Kong Medical Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkmj.org/resources/supp.htmlen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofHong Kong Medical Journalen_HK
dc.rightsHong Kong Medical Journal. Copyright © Hong Kong Academy of medicine press.-
dc.subjectEmission-computeden_HK
dc.subjectFluorodeoxyglucose F18en_HK
dc.subjectMagnetic resonance imagingen_HK
dc.subjectMagnetic resonance spectroscopyen_HK
dc.subjectPositron-emission tomographyen_HK
dc.subjectSingle-photonen_HK
dc.subjectTomographyen_HK
dc.subject.meshDiffusion Tensor Imaging - methods-
dc.subject.meshEpilepsy - diagnosis - pathology - radionuclide imaging-
dc.subject.meshTomography, Emission-Computed, Single-Photon/methods-
dc.subject.meshMagnetic Resonance Imaging - methods-
dc.subject.meshPositron-Emission Tomography - methods-
dc.titleNeuroimaging techniques in epilepsyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1024-2708&volume=16&issue=4&spage=292&epage=298&date=2010&atitle=Neuroimaging+Techniques+in+Epilepsyen_US
dc.identifier.emailLai, V:laiv@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailMak, HKF:makkf@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLai, V=rp01516en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityMak, HKF=rp00533en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.pmid20683073-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77957736401en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros178328en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros192692-
dc.identifier.hkuros198338-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77957736401&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume16en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage292en_HK
dc.identifier.epage298en_HK
dc.publisher.placeHong Kongen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLai, V=15829844300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMak, HKF=7004699149en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYung, AWY=7006387322en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, WY=25938053100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHung, KN=36544984600en_HK

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