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Article: Socio-economic disparities of childhood body mass index in a newly developed population: Evidence from Hong Kong's 'Children of 1997' birth cohort

TitleSocio-economic disparities of childhood body mass index in a newly developed population: Evidence from Hong Kong's 'Children of 1997' birth cohort
Authors
Issue Date2010
PublisherB M J Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.archdischild.com/
Citation
Archives Of Disease In Childhood, 2010, v. 95 n. 6, p. 437-443 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Childhood adiposity in developed countries is often associated with lower socio-economic position (SEP) of the family and neighbourhood. However, the association of adiposity with SEP varies with national income. The authors examined whether childhood BMI was associated with family or neighbourhood socio-economic characteristics in a recently and rapidly developed Chinese population. Methods: The authors used multilevel modelling in Hong Kong's population-representative 'Children of 1997' birth cohort (n=8327) to examine the association of BMI z-score and overweight (including obesity) at ages 6-11 years with parental education, mother's birthplace, sex and neighbourhood median income. Results: In 7108 (85 % successful follow-up) children, boys were more adipose than girls. The association of parental education with BMI z-score varied with mother's birthplace (p value for interaction 0.001). In children of Hong Kong-born mothers, parental education was negatively associated with BMI z-score (mean difference -0.15, 95% CI -0.25 to -0.05 for highest compared with lowest). However, in children of mainland China-born mothers, parental education was positively associated with BMI z-score (0.18, 95% CI 0.02 to 0.34 in the same comparison). Neighbourhood had no association with BMI z-score. Conclusions: In this recently developed Chinese population, there was no consistent association between socio-economic characteristics and childhood BMI. Other factors, such as experience of economic transition, as proxied by mother's place of birth, exerted a modifying impact. The cultural and biological mechanisms underlying these socio-historical intergenerational influences need to be determined, so that effective interventions can be implemented in China and elsewhere.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hub.hku.hk/handle/10722/128786
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.231
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.118
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Hong Kong Healthcare & Promotion Fund Committee in Hong Kong216106
Health and Health Services Research Fund in Hong Kong03040711
Research Fund for the Control of Infectious Diseases in Hong Kong04050172
The University of Hong Kong
Funding Information:

The initial study was supported by the Hong Kong Healthcare & Promotion Fund Committee in Hong Kong (Grant no 216106). Retrieval of additional data in 2005-2006 was funded by the Health and Health Services Research Fund in Hong Kong (Grant no 03040711). Retrieval of geo-spatial identifiers was funded by the Research Fund for the Control of Infectious Diseases in Hong Kong (Grant no 04050172). Recent re-establishment of contact with cohort members was funded by the University Research Committee SRT of Public Health Granted Research, The University of Hong Kong.

References
Grants

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSchooling, CMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYau, Cen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCowling, BJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-11-22T08:14:40Z-
dc.date.available2010-11-22T08:14:40Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationArchives Of Disease In Childhood, 2010, v. 95 n. 6, p. 437-443en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0003-9888en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hub.hku.hk/handle/10722/128786-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Childhood adiposity in developed countries is often associated with lower socio-economic position (SEP) of the family and neighbourhood. However, the association of adiposity with SEP varies with national income. The authors examined whether childhood BMI was associated with family or neighbourhood socio-economic characteristics in a recently and rapidly developed Chinese population. Methods: The authors used multilevel modelling in Hong Kong's population-representative 'Children of 1997' birth cohort (n=8327) to examine the association of BMI z-score and overweight (including obesity) at ages 6-11 years with parental education, mother's birthplace, sex and neighbourhood median income. Results: In 7108 (85 % successful follow-up) children, boys were more adipose than girls. The association of parental education with BMI z-score varied with mother's birthplace (p value for interaction 0.001). In children of Hong Kong-born mothers, parental education was negatively associated with BMI z-score (mean difference -0.15, 95% CI -0.25 to -0.05 for highest compared with lowest). However, in children of mainland China-born mothers, parental education was positively associated with BMI z-score (0.18, 95% CI 0.02 to 0.34 in the same comparison). Neighbourhood had no association with BMI z-score. Conclusions: In this recently developed Chinese population, there was no consistent association between socio-economic characteristics and childhood BMI. Other factors, such as experience of economic transition, as proxied by mother's place of birth, exerted a modifying impact. The cultural and biological mechanisms underlying these socio-historical intergenerational influences need to be determined, so that effective interventions can be implemented in China and elsewhere.en_HK
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherB M J Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.archdischild.com/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofArchives of Disease in Childhooden_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subject.meshAdiposity-
dc.subject.meshAnthropometry - methods-
dc.subject.meshBody Mass Index-
dc.subject.meshChild-
dc.subject.meshOverweight - epidemiology - etiology-
dc.titleSocio-economic disparities of childhood body mass index in a newly developed population: Evidence from Hong Kong's 'Children of 1997' birth cohorten_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0003-9888&volume=95&issue=6&spage=437&epage=443&date=2010&atitle=Socio-economic+disparities+of+childhood+body+mass+index+in+a+newly+developed+population:+evidence+from+Hong+Kong’s+‘Children+of+1997’+birth+cohort-
dc.identifier.emailSchooling, CM: cms1@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailYau, C: cynthia-yau@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailCowling, BJ: bcowling@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH: hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM: gmleung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySchooling, CM=rp00504en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityYau, C=rp00829en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCowling, BJ=rp01326en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/adc.2009.168542en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20418337-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77953706993en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros170715-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77953706993&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume95en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage437en_HK
dc.identifier.epage443en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000278002000008-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.relation.projectInfectious illness and secondhand smoke exposure in utero and during the first 8 years of life-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSchooling, CM=12808565000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYau, C=7007038452en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCowling, BJ=8644765500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, GM=7007159841en_HK

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