File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Conference Paper: Bilingual false recollection: an EEG study

TitleBilingual false recollection: an EEG study
Authors
KeywordsPsychology linguistics
Issue Date2006
PublisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/b&l
Citation
The 44th Annual Meeting of the Academy of Aphasia, Victoria, BC., 15-17 October 2006. In Brain and Language, 2006, v. 99 n. 1-2, p. 169-171 How to Cite?
AbstractINTRODUCTION: False recollection in the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) paradigm describes the phenomenon of remembering critical words, e.g., SLEEP that are thematically related to a list of study words, e.g., BED, REST, AWAKE. Different theoretical accounts of false recollection generate alternative predictions about the false memory effect. Activation monitoring theory (AMT) (Roediger & McDermott, 1999) assumes that false recollection of critical words results from failure to monitor the source of activation, which is the same process that is used to correctly identify studied words and thus support veridical recollection. Fuzzy Trace Theory (FTT) (Brainerd & Reyna, 2002) assumes that false memories arise because participants automatically infer the theme or meaning of studied words but confuse words presented at test with nonpresented items that are representative of that theme and veridical recollection depends on verbatim memory. The difference between these accounts is FTT allows for dissociable memory traces and AMT does not. …
DescriptionThese journal issues are the Special Abstract Issue of the Academy of Aphasia 2006 Program
Poster session 3 - Bilingual
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/128522
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.038
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.913
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMolina, AI-
dc.contributor.authorSu, IF-
dc.contributor.authorKnight, C-
dc.contributor.authorHolliday, R-
dc.contributor.authorWeekes, BS-
dc.date.accessioned2010-11-01T04:27:05Z-
dc.date.available2010-11-01T04:27:05Z-
dc.date.issued2006-
dc.identifier.citationThe 44th Annual Meeting of the Academy of Aphasia, Victoria, BC., 15-17 October 2006. In Brain and Language, 2006, v. 99 n. 1-2, p. 169-171-
dc.identifier.issn0093-934X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/128522-
dc.descriptionThese journal issues are the Special Abstract Issue of the Academy of Aphasia 2006 Program-
dc.descriptionPoster session 3 - Bilingual-
dc.description.abstractINTRODUCTION: False recollection in the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) paradigm describes the phenomenon of remembering critical words, e.g., SLEEP that are thematically related to a list of study words, e.g., BED, REST, AWAKE. Different theoretical accounts of false recollection generate alternative predictions about the false memory effect. Activation monitoring theory (AMT) (Roediger & McDermott, 1999) assumes that false recollection of critical words results from failure to monitor the source of activation, which is the same process that is used to correctly identify studied words and thus support veridical recollection. Fuzzy Trace Theory (FTT) (Brainerd & Reyna, 2002) assumes that false memories arise because participants automatically infer the theme or meaning of studied words but confuse words presented at test with nonpresented items that are representative of that theme and veridical recollection depends on verbatim memory. The difference between these accounts is FTT allows for dissociable memory traces and AMT does not. …-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/b&l-
dc.relation.ispartofBrain and Language-
dc.subjectPsychology linguistics-
dc.titleBilingual false recollection: an EEG studyen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0093-934X&volume=99&issue=1-2&spage=169&epage=171&date=2006&atitle=Bilingual+false+recollection:+an+EEG+study-
dc.identifier.emailSu, IF: ifansu@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailWeekes, BS: weekes@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.bandl.2006.06.099-
dc.identifier.hkuros172651-
dc.identifier.hkuros172675-
dc.identifier.volume99-
dc.identifier.issue1-2-
dc.identifier.spage169-
dc.identifier.epage171-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000242198900086-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-
dc.description.otherThe 44th Annual Meeting of the Academy of Aphasia, Victoria, BC., 15-17 October 2006. In Brain and Language, 2006, v. 99 n. 1-2, p. 169-171-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats