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Conference Paper: Normalization of semantic categorization deficit in first-episode schizophrenia patients following symptomatic recovery: a three-year prospective longitudinal study

TitleNormalization of semantic categorization deficit in first-episode schizophrenia patients following symptomatic recovery: a three-year prospective longitudinal study
Authors
Issue Date2010
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/schres
Citation
The 2nd Biennial Schizophrenia International Research Conference, Florence, Italy, 10-14 April 2010. In Schizophrenia Research, 2010, v. 117 n. 2-3, p. 292-293 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND: Semantic memory dysfunction has been suggested in schizophrenia using the categorization task. However, data were largely inconsistent and the longitudinal trajectory of the deficit was unknown. Current study aimed to explore the 3-year longitudinal course of semantic memory deficits in first-episode schizophrenia patients. METHODS: First-episode schizophrenia patients (DSM-IV) were assessed prospectively at the point of first contact (A1), after clinical stabilization (A2), and each year for the following 3 years (Y1, Y2, Y3) using the categorization task. Patients are required to make decision (yes or no) on whether a 'word' belonged to a 'category'. 40 pairs of words were divided into 4 categories: fruits, furniture, drinks and clothing. Each category (e.g., furniture) was subdivided into five degrees of semantic relatedness: (1) typical word of the category (e.g., table), (2) atypical of the category (e.g., bookcase), (3) borderline word (e.g., clock), (4) related but outside the category (e.g., painting) and (5) unrelated and outside the category (e.g., sun). Data on both reaction time and proportion of yes response were analyzed. Normal participants were assessed once. RESULTS: 37 first-episode schizophrenia patients and 37 normal were recruited (matched for gender, age and education). Five ANOVAs were carried out to detect the difference in the five semantic relatedness conditions between patients and control at each of the 5 timepoints. In the first ANOVA which compared patients at A1 and control, reaction times in all conditions were slower in patients compared with control (F(1, 72)=7.83, p=.007). Significant main effect of semantic relatedness condition (F(4, 288)=12.30, p<.001) and interaction effect were also found (F(4, 288)=4.88, p=.001). Post-hoc pairwise comparisons found the two groups were different with regard to typical (p=.006), related (p=.036), and unrelated condition (p<.001). Interestingly, the remaining ANOVAs produced the same results. Significant main effect of condition (p=.015, p<.001, p<.001, p<.001, respectively) was observed in patients at A2, Y1, Y2 and Y3 as compared with control. Besides, pairwise comparisons had suggested significant difference in all conditions (all with p<.001). Likewise, ANOVA was carried out in the yes response data and similar results were identified. Main effect of group was found at A1 only (F(1, 72)=7.10, P=.009) but not the other timepoints. DISCUSSION: The data clearly show semantic memory abnormalities (slower reaction time and more error, i.e., more yes response in the outside the category condition) in first-episode schizophrenia as compared with normal. Intriguingly, they largely normalized following symptomatic recovery and remained stable for up to the first three years of the disorder, suggesting a state effect rather than a trait effect.
DescriptionPoster no. 259
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/126783
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.453
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.304
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChen, EYHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHui, CLMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorDunn, ELWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMiao, MYKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYeung, WSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, CKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, WFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTang, WNen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-31T12:48:17Z-
dc.date.available2010-10-31T12:48:17Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationThe 2nd Biennial Schizophrenia International Research Conference, Florence, Italy, 10-14 April 2010. In Schizophrenia Research, 2010, v. 117 n. 2-3, p. 292-293en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0920-9964en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/126783-
dc.descriptionPoster no. 259-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Semantic memory dysfunction has been suggested in schizophrenia using the categorization task. However, data were largely inconsistent and the longitudinal trajectory of the deficit was unknown. Current study aimed to explore the 3-year longitudinal course of semantic memory deficits in first-episode schizophrenia patients. METHODS: First-episode schizophrenia patients (DSM-IV) were assessed prospectively at the point of first contact (A1), after clinical stabilization (A2), and each year for the following 3 years (Y1, Y2, Y3) using the categorization task. Patients are required to make decision (yes or no) on whether a 'word' belonged to a 'category'. 40 pairs of words were divided into 4 categories: fruits, furniture, drinks and clothing. Each category (e.g., furniture) was subdivided into five degrees of semantic relatedness: (1) typical word of the category (e.g., table), (2) atypical of the category (e.g., bookcase), (3) borderline word (e.g., clock), (4) related but outside the category (e.g., painting) and (5) unrelated and outside the category (e.g., sun). Data on both reaction time and proportion of yes response were analyzed. Normal participants were assessed once. RESULTS: 37 first-episode schizophrenia patients and 37 normal were recruited (matched for gender, age and education). Five ANOVAs were carried out to detect the difference in the five semantic relatedness conditions between patients and control at each of the 5 timepoints. In the first ANOVA which compared patients at A1 and control, reaction times in all conditions were slower in patients compared with control (F(1, 72)=7.83, p=.007). Significant main effect of semantic relatedness condition (F(4, 288)=12.30, p<.001) and interaction effect were also found (F(4, 288)=4.88, p=.001). Post-hoc pairwise comparisons found the two groups were different with regard to typical (p=.006), related (p=.036), and unrelated condition (p<.001). Interestingly, the remaining ANOVAs produced the same results. Significant main effect of condition (p=.015, p<.001, p<.001, p<.001, respectively) was observed in patients at A2, Y1, Y2 and Y3 as compared with control. Besides, pairwise comparisons had suggested significant difference in all conditions (all with p<.001). Likewise, ANOVA was carried out in the yes response data and similar results were identified. Main effect of group was found at A1 only (F(1, 72)=7.10, P=.009) but not the other timepoints. DISCUSSION: The data clearly show semantic memory abnormalities (slower reaction time and more error, i.e., more yes response in the outside the category condition) in first-episode schizophrenia as compared with normal. Intriguingly, they largely normalized following symptomatic recovery and remained stable for up to the first three years of the disorder, suggesting a state effect rather than a trait effect.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/schres-
dc.relation.ispartofSchizophrenia Researchen_HK
dc.titleNormalization of semantic categorization deficit in first-episode schizophrenia patients following symptomatic recovery: a three-year prospective longitudinal studyen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0920-9964&volume=117&issue=2-3&spage=292&epage=293&date=2010&atitle=Normalization+of+semantic+categorization+deficit+in+first-episode+schizophrenia+patients+following+symptomatic+recovery:+a+three-year+prospective+longitudinal+studyen_HK
dc.identifier.emailChen, EYH: eyhchen@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailHui, CLM: clmhui@hkusua.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChen, EYH=rp00392en_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.schres.2010.02.487-
dc.identifier.hkuros171806en_HK
dc.identifier.volume117en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2-3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage292en_HK
dc.identifier.epage293en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000276936800482-
dc.description.otherThe 2nd Biennial Schizophrenia International Research Conference, Florence, Italy, 10-14 April 2010. In Schizophrenia Research, 2010, v. 117 n. 2-3, p. 292-293-

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