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Article: Habitual physical activity is associated with endothelial function and endothelial progenitor cells in patients with stable coronary artery disease
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TitleHabitual physical activity is associated with endothelial function and endothelial progenitor cells in patients with stable coronary artery disease
 
AuthorsLuk, TH3
Dai, YL3
Siu, CW1 3
Yiu, KH3
Chan, HT3
Fong, DYT2
Lee, SWL3
Li, SW5
Tam, S4
Lau, CP3
Tse, HF1 3
 
KeywordsCoronary artery disease
Endothelial progenitor cells
Exercise
Physical activity level
 
Issue Date2009
 
PublisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.escardio.org/initiatives/journals/prevention
 
CitationEuropean Journal Of Cardiovascular Prevention And Rehabilitation, 2009, v. 16 n. 4, p. 464-471 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HJR.0b013e32832b38be
 
AbstractBACKGROUND: Exercise training reduces mortality in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD); however, the impact of habitual physical activity level (PAL) on vascular endothelial function and circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) remain unknown. METHODS: We assessed habitual PAL using a validated International Physical Activity Questionnaire in 116 patients (67.8±9.5 years; 81% male) with stable CAD and preserved left ventricular ejection fraction ?45%. The number of circulating CD34/KDR+ and CD133/KDR+ EPCs was determined by flow cytometry, and brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) was measured. RESULTS: The mean PAL of CAD patients with 1644-MET-min/week (where MET is metabolic equivalents). With higher habitual PAL tertiles, there were significant linear trends of increased FMD (P=0.001) and CD133/KDR+ EPCs (P=0.03), but not of CD34/KDR+ EPCs. Patients with the highest tertile of PAL were associated with an absolute increase of 1.89% in FMD (relative increase 68%, P=0.003) and 0.12% in CD133/KDR+ EPCs (relative increase 44%, P=0.01) compared with those in the lowest tertile of PAL, after adjusting for age, sex, presence of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hypercholesterolemia, smoking, and the use of medications including statins. However, neither CD34/KDR+ nor CD133/KDR+ EPCs significantly correlated with FMD. CONCLUSION: This study showed that higher habitual PAL in patients with CAD was associated with higher FMD and EPC count. Nonetheless, FMD only significantly correlated with increased PAL, but not EPC, suggesting that increased physical activity improves endothelial function through mechanisms other than increasing EPC count. © 2009 The European Society of Cardiology.
 
ISSN1741-8267
2013 Impact Factor: 3.691
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HJR.0b013e32832b38be
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000268869400009
Funding AgencyGrant Number
University of Hong Kong200507176137
Sun Chleh Yeh Heart Foundation
Funding Information:

The authors thank Dr Duncan Macfarlane, Institute of Human Performance, University of Hong Kong, for the use of the Chinese version of IPAQ in this study. This study was supported by the CRCG Small Project Funding of University of Hong Kong (Project No. 200507176137), and Sun Chleh Yeh Heart Foundation.

 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorLuk, TH
 
dc.contributor.authorDai, YL
 
dc.contributor.authorSiu, CW
 
dc.contributor.authorYiu, KH
 
dc.contributor.authorChan, HT
 
dc.contributor.authorFong, DYT
 
dc.contributor.authorLee, SWL
 
dc.contributor.authorLi, SW
 
dc.contributor.authorTam, S
 
dc.contributor.authorLau, CP
 
dc.contributor.authorTse, HF
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-31T12:31:21Z
 
dc.date.available2010-10-31T12:31:21Z
 
dc.date.issued2009
 
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Exercise training reduces mortality in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD); however, the impact of habitual physical activity level (PAL) on vascular endothelial function and circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) remain unknown. METHODS: We assessed habitual PAL using a validated International Physical Activity Questionnaire in 116 patients (67.8±9.5 years; 81% male) with stable CAD and preserved left ventricular ejection fraction ?45%. The number of circulating CD34/KDR+ and CD133/KDR+ EPCs was determined by flow cytometry, and brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) was measured. RESULTS: The mean PAL of CAD patients with 1644-MET-min/week (where MET is metabolic equivalents). With higher habitual PAL tertiles, there were significant linear trends of increased FMD (P=0.001) and CD133/KDR+ EPCs (P=0.03), but not of CD34/KDR+ EPCs. Patients with the highest tertile of PAL were associated with an absolute increase of 1.89% in FMD (relative increase 68%, P=0.003) and 0.12% in CD133/KDR+ EPCs (relative increase 44%, P=0.01) compared with those in the lowest tertile of PAL, after adjusting for age, sex, presence of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hypercholesterolemia, smoking, and the use of medications including statins. However, neither CD34/KDR+ nor CD133/KDR+ EPCs significantly correlated with FMD. CONCLUSION: This study showed that higher habitual PAL in patients with CAD was associated with higher FMD and EPC count. Nonetheless, FMD only significantly correlated with increased PAL, but not EPC, suggesting that increased physical activity improves endothelial function through mechanisms other than increasing EPC count. © 2009 The European Society of Cardiology.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationEuropean Journal Of Cardiovascular Prevention And Rehabilitation, 2009, v. 16 n. 4, p. 464-471 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HJR.0b013e32832b38be
 
dc.identifier.citeulike8154766
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HJR.0b013e32832b38be
 
dc.identifier.epage471
 
dc.identifier.hkuros174584
 
dc.identifier.hkuros158860
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000268869400009
Funding AgencyGrant Number
University of Hong Kong200507176137
Sun Chleh Yeh Heart Foundation
Funding Information:

The authors thank Dr Duncan Macfarlane, Institute of Human Performance, University of Hong Kong, for the use of the Chinese version of IPAQ in this study. This study was supported by the CRCG Small Project Funding of University of Hong Kong (Project No. 200507176137), and Sun Chleh Yeh Heart Foundation.

 
dc.identifier.issn1741-8267
2013 Impact Factor: 3.691
 
dc.identifier.issue4
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmid19587603
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-70349201154
 
dc.identifier.spage464
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/126484
 
dc.identifier.volume16
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.escardio.org/initiatives/journals/prevention
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofEuropean Journal of Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshCoronary Artery Disease - physiopathology - rehabilitation
 
dc.subject.meshEndothelial Cells - physiology
 
dc.subject.meshEndothelium, Vascular - physiology
 
dc.subject.meshExercise - physiology
 
dc.subject.meshStem Cells - physiology
 
dc.subjectCoronary artery disease
 
dc.subjectEndothelial progenitor cells
 
dc.subjectExercise
 
dc.subjectPhysical activity level
 
dc.titleHabitual physical activity is associated with endothelial function and endothelial progenitor cells in patients with stable coronary artery disease
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Chan, HT</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Fong, DYT</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Lee, SWL</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Li, SW</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Tam, S</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Lau, CP</contributor.author>
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Author Affiliations
  1. Research Centre of Heart
  2. The University of Hong Kong Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine
  3. The University of Hong Kong
  4. Queen Mary Hospital Hong Kong
  5. Tung Wah Hospital