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Article: Determinants of daytime blood pressure in relation to obstructive sleep apnea in men
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TitleDeterminants of daytime blood pressure in relation to obstructive sleep apnea in men
 
AuthorsLam, JCM1
Yan, CSW1
Lai, AYK1
Tam, S1
Fong, DYT1
Lam, B1
Ip, MSM1
 
KeywordsConventional risk factors
Daytime blood pressure
Obstructive sleep apnea
Sympathetic activity
 
Issue Date2009
 
PublisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00408/
 
CitationLung, 2009, v. 187 n. 5, p. 291-298 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00408-009-9161-7
 
AbstractThis study investigated the roles of different potential pathophysiological mechanisms in the determination of blood pressure in relation to obstructive sleep apnea. The study was designed as a cross-sectional study. Consecutive healthy male subjects who were to undergo polysomnography were recruited. Demographic and anthropometric data were collected. Blood pressure measurements were taken in the evening before sleep and the next morning on waking. Overnight urinary samples for catecholamines and fasting blood for cortisol, insulin, glucose, and lipids were taken. Ninety-four men were analyzed, with a mean age of 43.7 ± 9.3 years and mean apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) of 27.5 ± 26.2 events/h. Sixty-nine patients (73%) had obstructive sleep apnea (AHI ≥5). Urinary catecholamines were positively correlated with severity of sleep apnea, independent of obesity. Blood pressure measurements correlated with age, obesity, severity of sleep apnea, and urinary catecholamines. Regression analysis showed that sleep indices and urinary catecholamines were independent determinants of morning systolic and diastolic blood pressure, respectively, while total cholesterol and waist circumference were respective additional factors. Urinary catecholamines and waist circumference were determinants of evening blood pressure, with morning cortisol being an additional determinant for diastolic blood pressure. Obstructive sleep apnea and related sympathetic activity contributed significantly to the determination of daytime blood pressure in overweight middle-aged men without overt cardiometabolic diseases, and other contributing factors include abdominal obesity, total cholesterol, and cortisol levels. © 2009 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.
 
ISSN0341-2040
2013 Impact Factor: 2.171
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00408-009-9161-7
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000269880700004
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Lee Wing Tat Cardiorespiratory Research Fund, Department of Medicine, University of Hong Kong
Funding Information:

This study was supported by the Lee Wing Tat Cardiorespiratory Research Fund, Department of Medicine, University of Hong Kong.

 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorLam, JCM
 
dc.contributor.authorYan, CSW
 
dc.contributor.authorLai, AYK
 
dc.contributor.authorTam, S
 
dc.contributor.authorFong, DYT
 
dc.contributor.authorLam, B
 
dc.contributor.authorIp, MSM
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-31T12:31:17Z
 
dc.date.available2010-10-31T12:31:17Z
 
dc.date.issued2009
 
dc.description.abstractThis study investigated the roles of different potential pathophysiological mechanisms in the determination of blood pressure in relation to obstructive sleep apnea. The study was designed as a cross-sectional study. Consecutive healthy male subjects who were to undergo polysomnography were recruited. Demographic and anthropometric data were collected. Blood pressure measurements were taken in the evening before sleep and the next morning on waking. Overnight urinary samples for catecholamines and fasting blood for cortisol, insulin, glucose, and lipids were taken. Ninety-four men were analyzed, with a mean age of 43.7 ± 9.3 years and mean apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) of 27.5 ± 26.2 events/h. Sixty-nine patients (73%) had obstructive sleep apnea (AHI ≥5). Urinary catecholamines were positively correlated with severity of sleep apnea, independent of obesity. Blood pressure measurements correlated with age, obesity, severity of sleep apnea, and urinary catecholamines. Regression analysis showed that sleep indices and urinary catecholamines were independent determinants of morning systolic and diastolic blood pressure, respectively, while total cholesterol and waist circumference were respective additional factors. Urinary catecholamines and waist circumference were determinants of evening blood pressure, with morning cortisol being an additional determinant for diastolic blood pressure. Obstructive sleep apnea and related sympathetic activity contributed significantly to the determination of daytime blood pressure in overweight middle-aged men without overt cardiometabolic diseases, and other contributing factors include abdominal obesity, total cholesterol, and cortisol levels. © 2009 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationLung, 2009, v. 187 n. 5, p. 291-298 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00408-009-9161-7
 
dc.identifier.citeulike5400216
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00408-009-9161-7
 
dc.identifier.epage298
 
dc.identifier.hkuros174581
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000269880700004
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Lee Wing Tat Cardiorespiratory Research Fund, Department of Medicine, University of Hong Kong
Funding Information:

This study was supported by the Lee Wing Tat Cardiorespiratory Research Fund, Department of Medicine, University of Hong Kong.

 
dc.identifier.issn0341-2040
2013 Impact Factor: 2.171
 
dc.identifier.issue5
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmid19653037
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-70349240253
 
dc.identifier.spage291
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/126483
 
dc.identifier.volume187
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00408/
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofLung
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.rightsThe original publication is available at www.springerlink.com
 
dc.subject.meshAdult
 
dc.subject.meshBlood Pressure
 
dc.subject.meshCircadian Rhythm
 
dc.subject.meshHypertension - etiology - metabolism - physiopathology
 
dc.subject.meshSleep Apnea, Obstructive - complications - metabolism - physiopathology
 
dc.subjectConventional risk factors
 
dc.subjectDaytime blood pressure
 
dc.subjectObstructive sleep apnea
 
dc.subjectSympathetic activity
 
dc.titleDeterminants of daytime blood pressure in relation to obstructive sleep apnea in men
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong