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Conference Paper: Investigating staff capabilities and needs for effective use of online technologies

TitleInvestigating staff capabilities and needs for effective use of online technologies
Authors
Keywordscapacity building
technology application in higher education
staff development
Issue Date2006
PublisherAsia-Pacific Educational Research Association
Citation
Asia-Pacific Educational Research Association International Conference, Hong Kong, 28 – 30 November 2006 How to Cite?
AbstractCommon to all higher education institutions is the need to reform and change the curriculum to prepare students to become citizens in a world of knowledge-based economies (Bates, 2005). Students today need skills and abilities to work in teams, to cooperate, collaborate and learn with fellow students and staff in a community of learners. Within these communities learners need to be able to solve real world problems and be self-directed active learners constructing knowledge. This shift towards more active learning demands a more student-focused approach to the process of learning and teaching in higher education (Prosser & Trigwell, 1999) and that well-designed active learning is an effective way for student learning (Biggs, 2003; Ramsden, 2003; Healey & Roberts, 2004). There is also a growing body of evidence that technology applied to learning and teaching supports extended active learning in and out of class (Paulson, 2002; Williams, 2003). But ‘technology-enhanced learning demands that both technological and methodological abilities are put into play’ (Trentin, 2006, p. 182) and that it is difficult to find all these abilities in a single person. ‘However good a teacher might be in class, he/she may fail in a distance learning situation if lacking sufficient familiarity with technology-enhanced learning methods’ (Trentin, 2006, p. 184). This research suggests that faculties and universities as a whole need to pay close attention to staff capabilities and their use of technology and to offer staff development in ways that will best afford opportunities to improve on and re-think the way they teach and their students engage in learning through technology. Research undertaken in this paper investigates one faculty’s use of an online learning environment and a support structure that builds staff capabilities in using online technology to engage students in effective collaborative and meaningful real world activities.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/109591

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorFox, RMKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTrinidad, Sen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-26T01:28:48Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-26T01:28:48Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAsia-Pacific Educational Research Association International Conference, Hong Kong, 28 – 30 November 2006en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/109591-
dc.description.abstractCommon to all higher education institutions is the need to reform and change the curriculum to prepare students to become citizens in a world of knowledge-based economies (Bates, 2005). Students today need skills and abilities to work in teams, to cooperate, collaborate and learn with fellow students and staff in a community of learners. Within these communities learners need to be able to solve real world problems and be self-directed active learners constructing knowledge. This shift towards more active learning demands a more student-focused approach to the process of learning and teaching in higher education (Prosser & Trigwell, 1999) and that well-designed active learning is an effective way for student learning (Biggs, 2003; Ramsden, 2003; Healey & Roberts, 2004). There is also a growing body of evidence that technology applied to learning and teaching supports extended active learning in and out of class (Paulson, 2002; Williams, 2003). But ‘technology-enhanced learning demands that both technological and methodological abilities are put into play’ (Trentin, 2006, p. 182) and that it is difficult to find all these abilities in a single person. ‘However good a teacher might be in class, he/she may fail in a distance learning situation if lacking sufficient familiarity with technology-enhanced learning methods’ (Trentin, 2006, p. 184). This research suggests that faculties and universities as a whole need to pay close attention to staff capabilities and their use of technology and to offer staff development in ways that will best afford opportunities to improve on and re-think the way they teach and their students engage in learning through technology. Research undertaken in this paper investigates one faculty’s use of an online learning environment and a support structure that builds staff capabilities in using online technology to engage students in effective collaborative and meaningful real world activities.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherAsia-Pacific Educational Research Associationen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAsia-Pacific Educational Research Association International Conference, APERA 2006en_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectcapacity building-
dc.subjecttechnology application in higher education-
dc.subjectstaff development-
dc.titleInvestigating staff capabilities and needs for effective use of online technologiesen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.emailFox, RMK: bobfox@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityFox, RMK=rp00899en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.hkuros127949en_HK
dc.identifier.spage11en_HK

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