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Conference Paper: Hypoadiponectinaemia predic ts the devel opment ofhypertension in Chinese people

TitleHypoadiponectinaemia predic ts the devel opment ofhypertension in Chinese people
Authors
Issue Date2006
PublisherBlackwell Science
Citation
The 19th World Diabetes Congress, Cape Town, South Africa, 3-7 December 2006. In Diabetic Medicine, 2006, v. 23 n. S4, p. 465 Abstract no. A1292 How to Cite?
AbstractIntroduction: Hypertension is a common cardiovascular risk factorwhich contributes to the increased cardiovascular risk in diabetes.Hypoadiponectinaemia has been found in type 2 diabetes, hypertensionand coronary artery disease. A recent study suggests that replenishmentof adiponectin can ameliorate obesity-related hypertension in mice [1].The aim of this study is to assess whether adiponectin also plays a role inhypertension development in humans.Subjects and Methods: A nested case–control study was performed.Normotensive subjects (BP < 130/85 mmHg) were recruited from theHong Kong Cardiovascular Risk Factors Prevalence Study and followed-up prospectively for 5 years. At the year 5 follow-up, 75 recruitedsubjects (cases) had developed hypertension (BP ‡ 130/85 mmHg or onregular anti-hypertensive treatment). Controls consisted of age and sex-matched subjects (n = 150, matched to cases at a ratio of 2:1) whoremained normotensive at 5 years. Blood pressure was measured as themean of two readings taken after sitting for at least 10 min. Adiponectinlevel was measured with an in-house ELISA assay.Results: Hypertensive subjects had more adverse risk factors, includinghigher BMI, waist circumference, waist hip ratio and mean arterialpressure (MAP) at baseline, compared to controls (all P < 0.001). Baseline adiponectin levels were significantly lower in hypertensivesubjects (1.75 ± 0.48 lg/ml vs. 1.93 ± 0.38 lg/ml, hypertensive vs.control, P = 0.003). Logistic regression analysis showed that baselinesex-adjusted adiponectin level (OR 0.32, 95% CI: 0.13–0.82, P = 0.018)was an independent negative predictor of hypertension development at5 years, in a model that included age, BMI, family history of hypertensionand baseline MAP, which were all independent positive predictors ofhypertension.Conclusion: In this Chinese population, hypoadiponectinaemia was anindependent predictor of hypertension development during a 5-yearfollow up.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/101230
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.152
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.654

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorOng, LHYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChow, WSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTso, AWKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWat, NMSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorXu, Aen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFong, HYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorJanus, EDen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, KSLen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-25T19:41:09Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-25T19:41:09Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationThe 19th World Diabetes Congress, Cape Town, South Africa, 3-7 December 2006. In Diabetic Medicine, 2006, v. 23 n. S4, p. 465 Abstract no. A1292-
dc.identifier.issn0742-3071-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/101230-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Hypertension is a common cardiovascular risk factorwhich contributes to the increased cardiovascular risk in diabetes.Hypoadiponectinaemia has been found in type 2 diabetes, hypertensionand coronary artery disease. A recent study suggests that replenishmentof adiponectin can ameliorate obesity-related hypertension in mice [1].The aim of this study is to assess whether adiponectin also plays a role inhypertension development in humans.Subjects and Methods: A nested case–control study was performed.Normotensive subjects (BP < 130/85 mmHg) were recruited from theHong Kong Cardiovascular Risk Factors Prevalence Study and followed-up prospectively for 5 years. At the year 5 follow-up, 75 recruitedsubjects (cases) had developed hypertension (BP ‡ 130/85 mmHg or onregular anti-hypertensive treatment). Controls consisted of age and sex-matched subjects (n = 150, matched to cases at a ratio of 2:1) whoremained normotensive at 5 years. Blood pressure was measured as themean of two readings taken after sitting for at least 10 min. Adiponectinlevel was measured with an in-house ELISA assay.Results: Hypertensive subjects had more adverse risk factors, includinghigher BMI, waist circumference, waist hip ratio and mean arterialpressure (MAP) at baseline, compared to controls (all P < 0.001). Baseline adiponectin levels were significantly lower in hypertensivesubjects (1.75 ± 0.48 lg/ml vs. 1.93 ± 0.38 lg/ml, hypertensive vs.control, P = 0.003). Logistic regression analysis showed that baselinesex-adjusted adiponectin level (OR 0.32, 95% CI: 0.13–0.82, P = 0.018)was an independent negative predictor of hypertension development at5 years, in a model that included age, BMI, family history of hypertensionand baseline MAP, which were all independent positive predictors ofhypertension.Conclusion: In this Chinese population, hypoadiponectinaemia was anindependent predictor of hypertension development during a 5-yearfollow up.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherBlackwell Science-
dc.relation.ispartofDiabetic Medicineen_HK
dc.titleHypoadiponectinaemia predic ts the devel opment ofhypertension in Chinese peopleen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.emailChow, WS: chowws01@HKUCC.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWat, NMS: nmswat@HKUCC.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailXu, A: amxu@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, KSL: ksllam@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityXu, A=rp00485en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, KSL=rp00343en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1464-5491.2006.02038_8.x-
dc.identifier.hkuros137222en_HK

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