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Conference Paper: Ultrasound-enhanced osteogenesis of human mesenchymal stem cells encapsulated in collagen meshwork

TitleUltrasound-enhanced osteogenesis of human mesenchymal stem cells encapsulated in collagen meshwork
Authors
KeywordsBone tissue engineering
Encapsulated human mesenchymal stem cells
Osteogenesis
Ultrasound stimulation
Issue Date2009
Citation
Proceedings - Ieee Ultrasonics Symposium, 2009 How to Cite?
AbstractBone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are well-regarded as potential cell sources for regenerative medicine. An osteoinductive way of implanting these MSCs is to first encapsulate them into larger particles through collagen fiber meshes and then injecting these particles to the treatment site, but these particles' osteogenic differentiation is known to be slow for human MSCs (hMSCs). In this work, we investigated the possibility of using ultrasound to stimulate the osteogenesis of hMSCs in collagen-hMSC particles (6th passage; entrapped with type-I collagen; 2mm radius; 1mm thickness; 500,000 cells/ml concentration). The in-vitro calcium deposition level was studied over an 18-day period for collagen-hMSC particles that were routinely exposed to ultrasound (1MHz frequency; 30mW/cm2 intensity (SATA); 20% duty cycle; 30min daily exposure). Our phase contrast images showed that ultrasound-exposed collagen-hMSC particles had a darker appearance than the unexposed ones because of the increased presence of calcium deposits. Also, in our calcium assay, particles in the ultrasound-exposed group all showed increase in their calcium mass (N=6). A similar impact was observed for the collagen-hMSC particles that were only exposed to ultrasound in the first six days, thereby suggesting that ultrasound stimulation makes early impact on the osteogenic differentiation of these particles. These initial evidences indicate that ultrasound stimulation has potential in improving the efficacy of injectable bone tissue engineering by enhancing the osteogenic process of collagen-hMSC particles. ©2009 IEEE.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/98906
ISSN
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, HCTen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, MYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, BPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYu, ACHen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-25T18:07:21Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-25T18:07:21Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationProceedings - Ieee Ultrasonics Symposium, 2009en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1051-0117en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/98906-
dc.description.abstractBone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are well-regarded as potential cell sources for regenerative medicine. An osteoinductive way of implanting these MSCs is to first encapsulate them into larger particles through collagen fiber meshes and then injecting these particles to the treatment site, but these particles' osteogenic differentiation is known to be slow for human MSCs (hMSCs). In this work, we investigated the possibility of using ultrasound to stimulate the osteogenesis of hMSCs in collagen-hMSC particles (6th passage; entrapped with type-I collagen; 2mm radius; 1mm thickness; 500,000 cells/ml concentration). The in-vitro calcium deposition level was studied over an 18-day period for collagen-hMSC particles that were routinely exposed to ultrasound (1MHz frequency; 30mW/cm2 intensity (SATA); 20% duty cycle; 30min daily exposure). Our phase contrast images showed that ultrasound-exposed collagen-hMSC particles had a darker appearance than the unexposed ones because of the increased presence of calcium deposits. Also, in our calcium assay, particles in the ultrasound-exposed group all showed increase in their calcium mass (N=6). A similar impact was observed for the collagen-hMSC particles that were only exposed to ultrasound in the first six days, thereby suggesting that ultrasound stimulation makes early impact on the osteogenic differentiation of these particles. These initial evidences indicate that ultrasound stimulation has potential in improving the efficacy of injectable bone tissue engineering by enhancing the osteogenic process of collagen-hMSC particles. ©2009 IEEE.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofProceedings - IEEE Ultrasonics Symposiumen_HK
dc.subjectBone tissue engineeringen_HK
dc.subjectEncapsulated human mesenchymal stem cellsen_HK
dc.subjectOsteogenesisen_HK
dc.subjectUltrasound stimulationen_HK
dc.titleUltrasound-enhanced osteogenesis of human mesenchymal stem cells encapsulated in collagen meshworken_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.emailChan, BP:bpchan@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailYu, ACH:alfred.yu@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChan, BP=rp00087en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityYu, ACH=rp00657en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1109/ULTSYM.2009.5441901en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77952811983en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros155476en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77952811983&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, HCT=36117387200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, MY=36053841600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, BP=7201530390en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYu, ACH=8699317700en_HK

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