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Conference Paper: The effect of light stimulation or optic nerve transection on the expression of NADPH-d in a sub-population of amacrine cells

TitleThe effect of light stimulation or optic nerve transection on the expression of NADPH-d in a sub-population of amacrine cells
Authors
Keywordsamacrine cells
ganglion cells
nitric oxide
Issue Date2005
PublisherAssociation for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology
Citation
The Annual Meeting of the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO), Fort Lauderdale, Florida, 1-4 May 2005. In Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science, 2005, v. 46 n. 13, p. 5348 How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose: Amongst the variety of amacrine cells in the retina, there is a sub–population of cells expressing NADPH–d (Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate–diaphorase). However their roles in the processing of visual information are not well established. This study investigated the effect of light stimulation or optic nerve (ON) transection on the NADPH–d expressing amacrine cells in hamsters. Methods: 4 groups of adult golden hamster were used: a) normal control reared in normal light cycle (12 hours light and 12 hours dark cycle), b) normal dark reared animals, c) ON transection reared in normal light cycle, d) ON transection dark reared animals. The expression of NADPH–d in the ganglion cell layer (GCL) and inner nuclear layer (INL) of the retina was monitored at determined time points (one to four weeks). Results: In the normal control group, the NADPH–d expressing amacrine cells were found in both GCL and INL. In all the other 3 groups of animal: the dark reared normal, the dark reared ON transection, and the ON transection group reared in normal light cycle, the number of NADPH–d expressing amacrine cells in the GCL was down–regulated approximately 40%, whereas in the INL of hamster retina, it did not change significantly. Conclusions: The NADPH–d expressing amacrine cells in GCL and INL of hamster retina were differentially affected by light stimulation or ON transection, as the number of NADPH–d expressing amacrine cells in INL were not affected and yet there was about 40% down–regulation in the GCL in the dark rearing condition or after retinal ganglion cell (RGC) degeneration. This study suggests that the expression of NADPH–d in a sub–population of amacrine cells in GCL is sensitive to light stimulation and functionally dependent on the presence of RGC.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/95578
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSo, KFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChen, Ben_HK
dc.contributor.authorYu, EHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTay, DKCen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-25T16:06:40Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-25T16:06:40Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_HK
dc.identifier.citationThe Annual Meeting of the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO), Fort Lauderdale, Florida, 1-4 May 2005. In Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science, 2005, v. 46 n. 13, p. 5348en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1552-5783-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/95578-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Amongst the variety of amacrine cells in the retina, there is a sub–population of cells expressing NADPH–d (Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate–diaphorase). However their roles in the processing of visual information are not well established. This study investigated the effect of light stimulation or optic nerve (ON) transection on the NADPH–d expressing amacrine cells in hamsters. Methods: 4 groups of adult golden hamster were used: a) normal control reared in normal light cycle (12 hours light and 12 hours dark cycle), b) normal dark reared animals, c) ON transection reared in normal light cycle, d) ON transection dark reared animals. The expression of NADPH–d in the ganglion cell layer (GCL) and inner nuclear layer (INL) of the retina was monitored at determined time points (one to four weeks). Results: In the normal control group, the NADPH–d expressing amacrine cells were found in both GCL and INL. In all the other 3 groups of animal: the dark reared normal, the dark reared ON transection, and the ON transection group reared in normal light cycle, the number of NADPH–d expressing amacrine cells in the GCL was down–regulated approximately 40%, whereas in the INL of hamster retina, it did not change significantly. Conclusions: The NADPH–d expressing amacrine cells in GCL and INL of hamster retina were differentially affected by light stimulation or ON transection, as the number of NADPH–d expressing amacrine cells in INL were not affected and yet there was about 40% down–regulation in the GCL in the dark rearing condition or after retinal ganglion cell (RGC) degeneration. This study suggests that the expression of NADPH–d in a sub–population of amacrine cells in GCL is sensitive to light stimulation and functionally dependent on the presence of RGC.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherAssociation for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology-
dc.relation.ispartofInvestigative Ophthalmology & Visual Scienceen_HK
dc.subjectamacrine cells-
dc.subjectganglion cells-
dc.subjectnitric oxide-
dc.titleThe effect of light stimulation or optic nerve transection on the expression of NADPH-d in a sub-population of amacrine cellsen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.emailSo, KF: hrmaskf@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailTay, DKC: dkctay@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySo, KF=rp00329en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityTay, DKC=rp00336en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros107505en_HK
dc.identifier.spage230en_HK
dc.identifier.epage551en_HK

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