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Conference Paper: Increment of sleeping time does not implicate enhancement on memory and learning in adolescents

TitleIncrement of sleeping time does not implicate enhancement on memory and learning in adolescents
Authors
Issue Date2006
PublisherSociety for Neuroscience
Citation
Neuroscience 2006, Atlanta, GA, 14-18 October 2006, Program#/Poster#: 365.3/GG6 How to Cite?
AbstractSleep deprivation has been reported to decrease some cognitive performances. Adolescents are advised to sleep adequately in order to have better cognitive and physical development. Children aged 13-15 are suggested to achieve more than 8 or even 9 hours per day for sleep. Yet, nowadays, an increasing number of young people do not have sufficient sleeping time, which has been considered to affect their memory as well as learning effectiveness in daily schooling. To study the effect of sleeping hours on memory and learning performances, a hundred and three students aged 13-15 were interviewed about their sleeping habits. Their memory and learning ability were assessed with Hong Kong List Learning Test (HKLLT) produced by Department of Psychology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong. The HKLLT is a modified version of the California Verbal Learning Test. Our results showed that three groups of students (average daily sleeping hours: <6, 6-8 or >8) did not have significant differences in the learning slope, short and long recalls of the HKLLT. The results suggest that increment of sleeping hours does not show significant enhancement on memory and learning in adolescents.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/95379

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSum, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorLui, Ben_HK
dc.contributor.authorSy, Len_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, Wen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, Cen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSuen, Ken_HK
dc.contributor.authorChang, RCCen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-25T16:00:25Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-25T16:00:25Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationNeuroscience 2006, Atlanta, GA, 14-18 October 2006, Program#/Poster#: 365.3/GG6en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/95379-
dc.description.abstractSleep deprivation has been reported to decrease some cognitive performances. Adolescents are advised to sleep adequately in order to have better cognitive and physical development. Children aged 13-15 are suggested to achieve more than 8 or even 9 hours per day for sleep. Yet, nowadays, an increasing number of young people do not have sufficient sleeping time, which has been considered to affect their memory as well as learning effectiveness in daily schooling. To study the effect of sleeping hours on memory and learning performances, a hundred and three students aged 13-15 were interviewed about their sleeping habits. Their memory and learning ability were assessed with Hong Kong List Learning Test (HKLLT) produced by Department of Psychology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong. The HKLLT is a modified version of the California Verbal Learning Test. Our results showed that three groups of students (average daily sleeping hours: <6, 6-8 or >8) did not have significant differences in the learning slope, short and long recalls of the HKLLT. The results suggest that increment of sleeping hours does not show significant enhancement on memory and learning in adolescents.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherSociety for Neuroscience-
dc.relation.ispartofSociety for Neuroscience Annual Meetingen_HK
dc.titleIncrement of sleeping time does not implicate enhancement on memory and learning in adolescentsen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.emailChang, RCC: rccchang@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChang, RCC=rp00470en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros124886en_HK

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