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Conference Paper: Using nanotechnology to repair the body

TitleUsing nanotechnology to repair the body
Authors
KeywordsCNS regeneration
hemostasis
tissue repair
functional return of vision
nanomedicine
Issue Date2007
PublisherSENS Research Foundation
Citation
The 3rd Strategies for Engineered Negligible Senescence (SENS), Cambridge, UK, 6-10 September 2007 How to Cite?
AbstractThe intersection of nanotechnology and medicine is here. While nano biomedicine has led to wildly futuristic promises, it has also presented real breakthroughs in drug research, development and formulation. Two significant nanobiomedical advances will be discussed, each with the potential for great promise in treating human conditions in the very near future. First, using nanotechnology to reverse blindness and repair the brain. For axons to regenerate after injury in the central nervous system several formidable barriers must be overcome, such as scar tissue formation after tissue injury; gaps in nervous tissue formed during phagocytosis of dying cells after injury and the failure of many adult neurons to initiate axonal extension. Using the mammalian visual system as a model, we showed that a designed self-assembling peptide nanofiber scaffold created a permissive environment not only for axons to regenerate through the site of an acute injury, but also to knit the brain tissue together, demonstrated by the return of lost vision. Second, a nano hemostatic agent that immediately stops bleeding. Hemostasis is a major problem after trauma and during surgery; as much as 50% of surgical time can be spent packing wounds to reduce or control bleeding and there are few effective methods to stop it without causing secondary damage. We show that hemostasis can be achieved in less than 15 seconds, in multiple tissues as well as a variety of different wounds, using a self-assembling peptide, demonstrating the first time that nanotechnology has been used to stop bleeding in a surgical setting for animal models that does not rely on heat, pressure, platelet activation, adhesion, or desiccation to stop bleeding.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/95268

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorEllis-Behnke, RGen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLiang, YX-
dc.contributor.authorTay, DKC-
dc.contributor.authorSchneider, GE-
dc.contributor.authorSo, KF-
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-25T15:56:53Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-25T15:56:53Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationThe 3rd Strategies for Engineered Negligible Senescence (SENS), Cambridge, UK, 6-10 September 2007-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/95268-
dc.description.abstractThe intersection of nanotechnology and medicine is here. While nano biomedicine has led to wildly futuristic promises, it has also presented real breakthroughs in drug research, development and formulation. Two significant nanobiomedical advances will be discussed, each with the potential for great promise in treating human conditions in the very near future. First, using nanotechnology to reverse blindness and repair the brain. For axons to regenerate after injury in the central nervous system several formidable barriers must be overcome, such as scar tissue formation after tissue injury; gaps in nervous tissue formed during phagocytosis of dying cells after injury and the failure of many adult neurons to initiate axonal extension. Using the mammalian visual system as a model, we showed that a designed self-assembling peptide nanofiber scaffold created a permissive environment not only for axons to regenerate through the site of an acute injury, but also to knit the brain tissue together, demonstrated by the return of lost vision. Second, a nano hemostatic agent that immediately stops bleeding. Hemostasis is a major problem after trauma and during surgery; as much as 50% of surgical time can be spent packing wounds to reduce or control bleeding and there are few effective methods to stop it without causing secondary damage. We show that hemostasis can be achieved in less than 15 seconds, in multiple tissues as well as a variety of different wounds, using a self-assembling peptide, demonstrating the first time that nanotechnology has been used to stop bleeding in a surgical setting for animal models that does not rely on heat, pressure, platelet activation, adhesion, or desiccation to stop bleeding.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherSENS Research Foundation-
dc.relation.ispartofSENS3-
dc.subjectCNS regeneration-
dc.subjecthemostasis-
dc.subjecttissue repair-
dc.subjectfunctional return of vision-
dc.subjectnanomedicine-
dc.titleUsing nanotechnology to repair the bodyen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.emailEllis-Behnke, RG: rutledg@mit.eduen_HK
dc.identifier.authorityEllis-Behnke, RG=rp00252en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros138875en_HK

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