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Conference Paper: Differential effects of microglia/macrophages in the prevention of retinal ganglion cell loss in rats with laser-induced chronic ocular hypertension

TitleDifferential effects of microglia/macrophages in the prevention of retinal ganglion cell loss in rats with laser-induced chronic ocular hypertension
Authors
Issue Date2005
PublisherSociety for Neuroscience.
Citation
The 2005 Annual Meeting of the Society for Neuroscience (Neuroscience 2005), Washington, DC., 12-16 November 2005. How to Cite?
AbstractAlthough it is known that microglia/macrophages produce neuroprotective effects in acute injury, whether they do the same in chronic neurodegeneration such as glaucoma is largely unknown. Cataractogenic lens injury has been demonstrated in an optic nerve crush model to prevent retinal ganglion cell (RGC) loss probably mediated by microglia/macrophages. Using a laser-induced chronic ocular hypertension (COH) model, we systematically studied the influences of microglia/macrophages in RGC loss. Similar to optic nerve crush injury, cataractogenic lens injury provided neuroprotective effects on RGCs, probably mediated by the mild activation of microglia/macrophages. While a small number of microglia did not produce significant influence, injection of large number of microglial cells into the vitreous significantly increased RGC loss. Appropriate quantity (104 microglial cells per intraocular injection) markedly reduced RGC loss in the COH model. Monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP1) at low concentration (10ng and 100ng) provided significant neuroprotective effect on RGCs, which may attribute to the chemoattractive property on monocytes/macrophages to the retina. Potent stimulation of microglia/macrophages by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) increased the death of RGCs in the COH model. These results advance our understanding of the roles of microglia/macrophages in chronic neurodegeneration. Our results may pave a new road for therapeutic strategy in chronic neurological disorder like glaucoma. Supported by The study is fully supported by The Glaucoma Foundation, USA, to R.C.C. Chang
DescriptionPresentation no. 977.3
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/95121

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChiu, Ken_HK
dc.contributor.authorJi, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYu, MSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKwok, NSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSo, KFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChang, RCCen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-25T15:52:18Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-25T15:52:18Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_HK
dc.identifier.citationThe 2005 Annual Meeting of the Society for Neuroscience (Neuroscience 2005), Washington, DC., 12-16 November 2005.en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/95121-
dc.descriptionPresentation no. 977.3-
dc.description.abstractAlthough it is known that microglia/macrophages produce neuroprotective effects in acute injury, whether they do the same in chronic neurodegeneration such as glaucoma is largely unknown. Cataractogenic lens injury has been demonstrated in an optic nerve crush model to prevent retinal ganglion cell (RGC) loss probably mediated by microglia/macrophages. Using a laser-induced chronic ocular hypertension (COH) model, we systematically studied the influences of microglia/macrophages in RGC loss. Similar to optic nerve crush injury, cataractogenic lens injury provided neuroprotective effects on RGCs, probably mediated by the mild activation of microglia/macrophages. While a small number of microglia did not produce significant influence, injection of large number of microglial cells into the vitreous significantly increased RGC loss. Appropriate quantity (104 microglial cells per intraocular injection) markedly reduced RGC loss in the COH model. Monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP1) at low concentration (10ng and 100ng) provided significant neuroprotective effect on RGCs, which may attribute to the chemoattractive property on monocytes/macrophages to the retina. Potent stimulation of microglia/macrophages by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) increased the death of RGCs in the COH model. These results advance our understanding of the roles of microglia/macrophages in chronic neurodegeneration. Our results may pave a new road for therapeutic strategy in chronic neurological disorder like glaucoma. Supported by The study is fully supported by The Glaucoma Foundation, USA, to R.C.C. Chang-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherSociety for Neuroscience.-
dc.relation.ispartofNeuroscience 2005en_HK
dc.titleDifferential effects of microglia/macrophages in the prevention of retinal ganglion cell loss in rats with laser-induced chronic ocular hypertensionen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.emailSo, KF: hrmaskf@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChang, RCC: rccchang@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySo, KF=rp00329en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChang, RCC=rp00470en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros107144en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros148403-

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