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Conference Paper: Lithium enhances proliferation and neuronal differentiation of neural progenitor cells in vitro and after transplantation into the adult rat spinal cord

TitleLithium enhances proliferation and neuronal differentiation of neural progenitor cells in vitro and after transplantation into the adult rat spinal cord
Authors
Issue Date2007
PublisherSociety for Neuroscience
Citation
Neuroscience 2007, San Diego, CA, 3-7 November 2007, Program#/Poster#: 236.15/C3 How to Cite?
AbstractTransplantation of neural progenitor cells (NPCs) holds great potential for the treatment of spinal cord injuries. The survival and differential fates of transplanted NPCs in the cord are key factors contributing to the success of the therapy. In this study, we investigate the effects of lithium, a widely used antidepressant drug, on the survival, proliferation and differentiation of spinal cord-derived NPCs in cultures and after transplantation into the spinal cord. Our results show that clinically relevant doses of lithium increase the proliferation of grafted NPCs at 2 weeks post-grafting and neuronal generation by grafted NPCs at 2 weeks and 4 weeks post-grafting. However, lithium does not cause preferential differentiation of NPCs into astrocytes or oligodendrocytes both in vitro and after transplantation. Our results also show that chronic treatment with lithium (up to 4 weeks) reduces microglia and macrophage activation, indicating that lithium treatment can affect the host immune response. The results of the present study provide evidence that lithium may have therapeutic potential in cell replacement strategies for CNS injury due to its ability to promote proliferation and neuronal generation of grafted NPCs and reduce the host immune reaction. Corresponding author: Wutian Wu, wtwu@hkucc.hku.hk
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/95109

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSu, Hen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChu, THen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWu, Wen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-25T15:51:56Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-25T15:51:56Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationNeuroscience 2007, San Diego, CA, 3-7 November 2007, Program#/Poster#: 236.15/C3-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/95109-
dc.description.abstractTransplantation of neural progenitor cells (NPCs) holds great potential for the treatment of spinal cord injuries. The survival and differential fates of transplanted NPCs in the cord are key factors contributing to the success of the therapy. In this study, we investigate the effects of lithium, a widely used antidepressant drug, on the survival, proliferation and differentiation of spinal cord-derived NPCs in cultures and after transplantation into the spinal cord. Our results show that clinically relevant doses of lithium increase the proliferation of grafted NPCs at 2 weeks post-grafting and neuronal generation by grafted NPCs at 2 weeks and 4 weeks post-grafting. However, lithium does not cause preferential differentiation of NPCs into astrocytes or oligodendrocytes both in vitro and after transplantation. Our results also show that chronic treatment with lithium (up to 4 weeks) reduces microglia and macrophage activation, indicating that lithium treatment can affect the host immune response. The results of the present study provide evidence that lithium may have therapeutic potential in cell replacement strategies for CNS injury due to its ability to promote proliferation and neuronal generation of grafted NPCs and reduce the host immune reaction. Corresponding author: Wutian Wu, wtwu@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherSociety for Neuroscience-
dc.relation.ispartofSociety for Neuroscience Annual Meetingen_HK
dc.titleLithium enhances proliferation and neuronal differentiation of neural progenitor cells in vitro and after transplantation into the adult rat spinal corden_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWu, W: wtwu@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWu, W=rp00419en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros141227en_HK

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