File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Conference Paper: The genetic functional matrix theory

TitleThe genetic functional matrix theory
Authors
Issue Date2006
PublisherOxford University Press
Citation
The 81st Congress of European Orthodontic Society, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 3–7 June 2005. In The European Journal of Orthodontics, 2006, v. 28 n. 2, p. e122 Abstract no.262 How to Cite?
AbstractAIM: The human genome project demonstrated genomic controls of all developmental processes, at cellular, structural and organ levels. Microarray technology has been applied to decipher the signals that trigger and control specific molecular events of in vitro differentiation of cartilage and bone. Cartilage plays a critical role in condylar growth because it is the template onto which bone forms. The objectives of the current study were 1. To screen, using microarray analysis, for the expression profile of genes related to chondrogenesis in the condyle; 2. To identify genes related to the ‘mechanotransduction theory’ that are expressed in condylar cartilage; 3. To correlate such genes to genes that regulate condylar cartilage formation. MATERIALS AND METHOD: Two hundred and eighty rats were divided into seven experimental (advancement) and seven control groups. The rats were sacrificed at different time points and total RNA was extracted for microarray analysis and RT-PCR. ‘Gene spring software’ was used in the analysis of microarray results and the search was limited to genes that showed a 2-fold or more change between groups. RESULTS: Of 624 genes, only 25 were related to different aspects of cartilage development. Fifteen genes were up-regulated while 10 were down-regulated. Several genes were identified for the first time in the condyles and were cell-cell attachment genes (CHAD), cell-matrix attachment genes (CCAM4), cellular movement genes (myosin). CONCLUSIONS: Transmission of extra-skeletal stimuli to cells in condylar cartilage through mechanotransduction leads to expression of several genes that directly impact on condylar growth. This demonstrates an orchestrated interplay between mechanotransduction and genetic regulation.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/94585
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.44
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.090

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorRabie, ABMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-25T15:35:47Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-25T15:35:47Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationThe 81st Congress of European Orthodontic Society, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 3–7 June 2005. In The European Journal of Orthodontics, 2006, v. 28 n. 2, p. e122 Abstract no.262en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0141-5387-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/94585-
dc.description.abstractAIM: The human genome project demonstrated genomic controls of all developmental processes, at cellular, structural and organ levels. Microarray technology has been applied to decipher the signals that trigger and control specific molecular events of in vitro differentiation of cartilage and bone. Cartilage plays a critical role in condylar growth because it is the template onto which bone forms. The objectives of the current study were 1. To screen, using microarray analysis, for the expression profile of genes related to chondrogenesis in the condyle; 2. To identify genes related to the ‘mechanotransduction theory’ that are expressed in condylar cartilage; 3. To correlate such genes to genes that regulate condylar cartilage formation. MATERIALS AND METHOD: Two hundred and eighty rats were divided into seven experimental (advancement) and seven control groups. The rats were sacrificed at different time points and total RNA was extracted for microarray analysis and RT-PCR. ‘Gene spring software’ was used in the analysis of microarray results and the search was limited to genes that showed a 2-fold or more change between groups. RESULTS: Of 624 genes, only 25 were related to different aspects of cartilage development. Fifteen genes were up-regulated while 10 were down-regulated. Several genes were identified for the first time in the condyles and were cell-cell attachment genes (CHAD), cell-matrix attachment genes (CCAM4), cellular movement genes (myosin). CONCLUSIONS: Transmission of extra-skeletal stimuli to cells in condylar cartilage through mechanotransduction leads to expression of several genes that directly impact on condylar growth. This demonstrates an orchestrated interplay between mechanotransduction and genetic regulation.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherOxford University Press-
dc.relation.ispartofThe European Journal of Orthodonticsen_HK
dc.titleThe genetic functional matrix theoryen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.emailRabie, ABM: rabie@hkusua.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityRabie, ABM=rp00029en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/ejo/cjl019-
dc.identifier.hkuros110891en_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats