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Article: Classroom contexts: Connections between class size and within class grouping

TitleClassroom contexts: Connections between class size and within class grouping
Authors
KeywordsReferences (34) View In Table Layout
Issue Date2001
PublisherThe British Psychological Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.bps.org.uk/publications/jEP_1.cfm
Citation
British Journal Of Educational Psychology, 2001, v. 71 n. 2, p. 283-302 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground. There has been a vigorous debate for many years about the educational effects of class size differences, but even if differences have an impact on pupils' academic progress this still leaves unanswered important questions about what mediates the effect. Aims. This paper is informed by a classroom contextual perspective, and examines associations between class size and within class groupings (in terms of size and number of groups, adult presence in groups, and type of interaction between grouping members). Age differences in these relationships are also explored. Samples. The quantitative study is based on analysis of 3157 groupings, from 672 Reception, Year 2 and Year 5 classes in 331 schools. The qualitative study was based on 12 classes in 8 case study schools, and questionnaire responses completed by over 100 class teachers. Methods. Links between size of class and within class groupings were examined on the basis of a 'grouping mapping survey', in which teachers at a given time in the school day provided information on group size and number, adult presence, and type of interaction between pupils, and complementary qualitative analyses of data from teacher-completed questionnaires, and interviews. Results. The number of groups in a class increased with the size of the class. Over all three year groups, small classes had on average just over three groups, while large classes approached six groups. The size of groups in the class decreased with size of class. In class sizes over 25, pupils were more likely to be in a large group of 7-10, while in classes under 25 they were more likely to be in whole class groupings. Qualitative analyses showed that teachers felt that groups of 7-10 pupils had negative educational effects, for example, in terms of the quality and quantity of teaching and children's concentration and contribution in groups. Conclusions. Results suggest that the effects of class size can be best seen as through the size and number of groups, which will then have implications for learning experiences. So while debate about size of class has often been in terms of reduced size of class resulting in pupil academic gains, it is also important educationally to consider within class grouping size and number, and their effects.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/92985
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.0
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.304
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBlatchford, Pen_HK
dc.contributor.authorBaines, Een_HK
dc.contributor.authorKutnick, Pen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMartin, Cen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-22T05:05:58Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-22T05:05:58Z-
dc.date.issued2001en_HK
dc.identifier.citationBritish Journal Of Educational Psychology, 2001, v. 71 n. 2, p. 283-302en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0007-0998en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/92985-
dc.description.abstractBackground. There has been a vigorous debate for many years about the educational effects of class size differences, but even if differences have an impact on pupils' academic progress this still leaves unanswered important questions about what mediates the effect. Aims. This paper is informed by a classroom contextual perspective, and examines associations between class size and within class groupings (in terms of size and number of groups, adult presence in groups, and type of interaction between grouping members). Age differences in these relationships are also explored. Samples. The quantitative study is based on analysis of 3157 groupings, from 672 Reception, Year 2 and Year 5 classes in 331 schools. The qualitative study was based on 12 classes in 8 case study schools, and questionnaire responses completed by over 100 class teachers. Methods. Links between size of class and within class groupings were examined on the basis of a 'grouping mapping survey', in which teachers at a given time in the school day provided information on group size and number, adult presence, and type of interaction between pupils, and complementary qualitative analyses of data from teacher-completed questionnaires, and interviews. Results. The number of groups in a class increased with the size of the class. Over all three year groups, small classes had on average just over three groups, while large classes approached six groups. The size of groups in the class decreased with size of class. In class sizes over 25, pupils were more likely to be in a large group of 7-10, while in classes under 25 they were more likely to be in whole class groupings. Qualitative analyses showed that teachers felt that groups of 7-10 pupils had negative educational effects, for example, in terms of the quality and quantity of teaching and children's concentration and contribution in groups. Conclusions. Results suggest that the effects of class size can be best seen as through the size and number of groups, which will then have implications for learning experiences. So while debate about size of class has often been in terms of reduced size of class resulting in pupil academic gains, it is also important educationally to consider within class grouping size and number, and their effects.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherThe British Psychological Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.bps.org.uk/publications/jEP_1.cfmen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofBritish Journal of Educational Psychologyen_HK
dc.subjectReferences (34) View In Table Layouten_HK
dc.titleClassroom contexts: Connections between class size and within class groupingen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailKutnick, P: pkutnick@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityKutnick, P=rp01414en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0035379229en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0035379229&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume71en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage283en_HK
dc.identifier.epage302en_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBlatchford, P=7003974553en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBaines, E=7004063555en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKutnick, P=6602743302en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMartin, C=7405844658en_HK

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