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Article: Academic achievement, pupil participation and integration of group work skills in secondary school classrooms in Trinidad and Barbados

TitleAcademic achievement, pupil participation and integration of group work skills in secondary school classrooms in Trinidad and Barbados
Authors
KeywordsRelational approach
Social inclusion
Traditional pedagogy
Issue Date2008
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ijedudev
Citation
International Journal Of Educational Development, 2008, v. 28 n. 2, p. 176-194 How to Cite?
AbstractStudies have shown a positive relationship between a rise in schooling levels and economic production [World Bank, 2005. A Time to Choose: Caribbean Development in the 21st Century. World Bank, Washington, DC; Jules, V., Panneflek, A., 2000. EFA in the Caribbean: Assessment 2000, Sub-Regional Report, vol. 2, The State of Education in the Caribbean in the 1990s. UNESCO, Kingston, Jamaica; Haddad, W.D., 1990. Education and Development; Evidence for New Priorities. World Bank Discussion Paper 95. The World Bank, Washington, DC; McClelland, D., 1969. Does Education Accelerate Economic Growth. In: Eckstein, M.A., Noah, H.J. (Eds.), Scientific Investigations in Comparative Education. Macmillan, London], but this link may be limited in systems of education where traditional pedagogic methods have been dominant (such as the Caribbean islands of Trinidad and Barbados where underachievement is also associated with lack of participation and low levels of social inclusion skills by teachers: World Bank, 1992. Access, Quality and Efficiency in Caribbean Education: a Regional Study. World Bank, Washington, DC; Kutnick, P., Jules, V., Layne, A., 1997. Gender and School Achievement in the Caribbean. Department for International Development, London). Into traditional classroom contexts in Trinidad and Barbados, a new social pedagogic method was introduced by teachers and changes in attainment and motivation of pupils and attitudes of teachers were assessed over two terms in secondary schools. Social Studies teachers participated in this action research study. They co-developed and applied a relationally based group work training programme and were provided supportive visits by a research officer between December and June of a school year. Data were collected from nearly 300 pupils in January and July, including: end-of-term, school-based attainment scores in social studies; a teacher-completed questionnaire for each child in class concerning pupil classroom performance (perceptions of knowledge, interactions with teacher and peers); and a pupil-completed questionnaire concerning attitudes to interpersonal contexts for classroom learning. In addition, reflective interviews were undertaken with pupils and teachers at the end of the programme. Over the period studied, virtually all pupils improved their social studies attainment; especially the lowest achieving pupils. Pupils improved their attitudes towards working with others and expectations of achievement in schools. Teachers' understanding of a 'good pupil' also changed-recognising of the importance of social inclusion at the classroom level and relational/groupworking skills among pupils. Overcoming educational underachievement and enhancing economic production is not simply a matter of access to schools; especially where traditional pedagogic methods appear as the norm in schooling. Greater attention needs to be given to helping teachers acquire (and use) additional socially inclusive/relational approaches. © 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/92977
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.067
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.886
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLayne, Aen_HK
dc.contributor.authorJules, Ven_HK
dc.contributor.authorKutnick, Pen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLayne, Cen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-22T05:05:44Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-22T05:05:44Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Educational Development, 2008, v. 28 n. 2, p. 176-194en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0738-0593en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/92977-
dc.description.abstractStudies have shown a positive relationship between a rise in schooling levels and economic production [World Bank, 2005. A Time to Choose: Caribbean Development in the 21st Century. World Bank, Washington, DC; Jules, V., Panneflek, A., 2000. EFA in the Caribbean: Assessment 2000, Sub-Regional Report, vol. 2, The State of Education in the Caribbean in the 1990s. UNESCO, Kingston, Jamaica; Haddad, W.D., 1990. Education and Development; Evidence for New Priorities. World Bank Discussion Paper 95. The World Bank, Washington, DC; McClelland, D., 1969. Does Education Accelerate Economic Growth. In: Eckstein, M.A., Noah, H.J. (Eds.), Scientific Investigations in Comparative Education. Macmillan, London], but this link may be limited in systems of education where traditional pedagogic methods have been dominant (such as the Caribbean islands of Trinidad and Barbados where underachievement is also associated with lack of participation and low levels of social inclusion skills by teachers: World Bank, 1992. Access, Quality and Efficiency in Caribbean Education: a Regional Study. World Bank, Washington, DC; Kutnick, P., Jules, V., Layne, A., 1997. Gender and School Achievement in the Caribbean. Department for International Development, London). Into traditional classroom contexts in Trinidad and Barbados, a new social pedagogic method was introduced by teachers and changes in attainment and motivation of pupils and attitudes of teachers were assessed over two terms in secondary schools. Social Studies teachers participated in this action research study. They co-developed and applied a relationally based group work training programme and were provided supportive visits by a research officer between December and June of a school year. Data were collected from nearly 300 pupils in January and July, including: end-of-term, school-based attainment scores in social studies; a teacher-completed questionnaire for each child in class concerning pupil classroom performance (perceptions of knowledge, interactions with teacher and peers); and a pupil-completed questionnaire concerning attitudes to interpersonal contexts for classroom learning. In addition, reflective interviews were undertaken with pupils and teachers at the end of the programme. Over the period studied, virtually all pupils improved their social studies attainment; especially the lowest achieving pupils. Pupils improved their attitudes towards working with others and expectations of achievement in schools. Teachers' understanding of a 'good pupil' also changed-recognising of the importance of social inclusion at the classroom level and relational/groupworking skills among pupils. Overcoming educational underachievement and enhancing economic production is not simply a matter of access to schools; especially where traditional pedagogic methods appear as the norm in schooling. Greater attention needs to be given to helping teachers acquire (and use) additional socially inclusive/relational approaches. © 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ijedudeven_HK
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Educational Developmenten_HK
dc.subjectRelational approachen_HK
dc.subjectSocial inclusionen_HK
dc.subjectTraditional pedagogyen_HK
dc.titleAcademic achievement, pupil participation and integration of group work skills in secondary school classrooms in Trinidad and Barbadosen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailKutnick, P: pkutnick@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityKutnick, P=rp01414en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ijedudev.2007.01.001en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-37549025027en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-37549025027&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume28en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage176en_HK
dc.identifier.epage194en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000253168200006-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLayne, A=24458225700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJules, V=6505810211en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKutnick, P=6602743302en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLayne, C=23100629400en_HK

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