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Article: Student perceptions of a good teacher: The gender perspective

TitleStudent perceptions of a good teacher: The gender perspective
Authors
Issue Date1997
PublisherThe British Psychological Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.bps.org.uk/publications/jEP_1.cfm
Citation
British Journal of Educational Psychology, 1997, v. 67 n. 4, p. 497-511 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground. A large-scale survey of pupils' perceptions of a good teacher in the Caribbean republic of Trinidad and Tobago is reported. An essay-based, interpretative mode of research was used to elicit and identify constructs used by boys and girls. Aims. The study explores similarities and differences between boys and girls in their perceptions of a good teacher, in a society where girls achieve superior academic performance (than boys). Sample. A total of 1756 pupils and students aged between 8 and 16 provided the sample, which was proportional, stratified, clustered. Within these constraints classrooms were randomly selected to be representative of primary and secondary schools across the two islands. Method: Altogether 1539 essays and 217 interviews were content analysed, coded for age development and compared between boys and girls. Content items identified by the pupils were logically grouped into: physical and personal characteristics of the teacher, quality of the relationship between the teacher and pupil, control of behaviour by the teacher, descriptions of the teaching process, and educational and other outcomes obtained by pupils due to teacher efforts. Results. Female pupils identified more good teacher concepts at all age levels than males. There was some commonality between the sexes in concepts regarding interpersonal relationships and inclusiveness in the good teachers' teaching practices and boys showed significantly greater concerns regarding teacher control and use of punishment. Males as young as 8 years stated that good teachers should be sensitive to their needs. Only among the 16-year-old males were males noted as good teachers. Conclusion. Consideration is given to the roles of male and female teachers, how their classroom actions may set the basis for future success (or failure) of their pupils, and the needs of pupils with regard to teacher support within developing and developed countries.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/92971
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.0
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.304
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorJules, Ven_HK
dc.contributor.authorKutnick, Pen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-22T05:05:33Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-22T05:05:33Z-
dc.date.issued1997en_HK
dc.identifier.citationBritish Journal of Educational Psychology, 1997, v. 67 n. 4, p. 497-511en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0007-0998en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/92971-
dc.description.abstractBackground. A large-scale survey of pupils' perceptions of a good teacher in the Caribbean republic of Trinidad and Tobago is reported. An essay-based, interpretative mode of research was used to elicit and identify constructs used by boys and girls. Aims. The study explores similarities and differences between boys and girls in their perceptions of a good teacher, in a society where girls achieve superior academic performance (than boys). Sample. A total of 1756 pupils and students aged between 8 and 16 provided the sample, which was proportional, stratified, clustered. Within these constraints classrooms were randomly selected to be representative of primary and secondary schools across the two islands. Method: Altogether 1539 essays and 217 interviews were content analysed, coded for age development and compared between boys and girls. Content items identified by the pupils were logically grouped into: physical and personal characteristics of the teacher, quality of the relationship between the teacher and pupil, control of behaviour by the teacher, descriptions of the teaching process, and educational and other outcomes obtained by pupils due to teacher efforts. Results. Female pupils identified more good teacher concepts at all age levels than males. There was some commonality between the sexes in concepts regarding interpersonal relationships and inclusiveness in the good teachers' teaching practices and boys showed significantly greater concerns regarding teacher control and use of punishment. Males as young as 8 years stated that good teachers should be sensitive to their needs. Only among the 16-year-old males were males noted as good teachers. Conclusion. Consideration is given to the roles of male and female teachers, how their classroom actions may set the basis for future success (or failure) of their pupils, and the needs of pupils with regard to teacher support within developing and developed countries.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherThe British Psychological Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.bps.org.uk/publications/jEP_1.cfmen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofBritish Journal of Educational Psychologyen_HK
dc.titleStudent perceptions of a good teacher: The gender perspectiveen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailKutnick, P: pkutnick@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityKutnick, P=rp01414en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.pmid9449185-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0345948791en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0345948791&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume67en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage497en_HK
dc.identifier.epage511en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000071065800008-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJules, V=6505810211en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKutnick, P=6602743302en_HK
dc.customcontrol.immutablesml 140625-

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