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Article: Pupil groupings in primary school classrooms: Sites for learning and social pedagogy?

TitlePupil groupings in primary school classrooms: Sites for learning and social pedagogy?
Authors
Issue Date2002
PublisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/01411926.asp
Citation
British Educational Research Journal, 2002, v. 28 n. 2, p. 187-206 How to Cite?
AbstractStudies of teaching and learning within classrooms rarely consider the multilayered effects of social context, especially involving within-class groupings. Yet, all pupils in classes are placed in some form of grouping throughout their classroom life and this will have an impact on their learning. This article seeks to move forward the understanding of within-class groupings in real classrooms. Five 'core themes' central to pupils' experience of groups in classrooms are identified (group size, group composition, learning tasks, within group interaction and adult presence) and used as a basis to collect information on classroom groupings (using a novel classroom 'mapping' survey). Teachers in 187 classrooms from Years 2 and 5 were surveyed and undertook the mapping during normal classroom work time. The most common group size found was the small group of 4-6 pupils. Other group sizes, including whole classes, individuals, dyads, and triads were less frequent. Most pupil groupings were teacher designated and combined girls and boys of similar ability. Groupings mainly studied English and mathematics, and worked on individuated tasks involving the practice or revision of skills/knowledge. Adults were present with one-third of groupings - with particular adults interacting with particular types of groupings (low-ability boys, high-ability girls, and whole classes). When data from the themes are interrelated especially group size and composition with learning task and interaction type, many points of concern arise. Findings suggest that teachers may not think strategically about the size and composition of groupings in relation to the tasks assigned. Adult presence is associated with control of knowledge and behaviour, and different types of adults are associated with the support of groupings at different levels of ability. Teachers provide little training for children to develop group work skills, and offer little opportunity for these skills to be practised in the promotion of learning. The findings and discussion combine to identify that the area of 'social pedagogy of pupil grouping' is a new and legitimate concern, and that further (and more focused) research in the area should be undertaken.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/92968
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.124
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.938
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKutnick, Pen_HK
dc.contributor.authorBlatchford, Pen_HK
dc.contributor.authorBaines, Een_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-22T05:05:27Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-22T05:05:27Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_HK
dc.identifier.citationBritish Educational Research Journal, 2002, v. 28 n. 2, p. 187-206en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0141-1926en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/92968-
dc.description.abstractStudies of teaching and learning within classrooms rarely consider the multilayered effects of social context, especially involving within-class groupings. Yet, all pupils in classes are placed in some form of grouping throughout their classroom life and this will have an impact on their learning. This article seeks to move forward the understanding of within-class groupings in real classrooms. Five 'core themes' central to pupils' experience of groups in classrooms are identified (group size, group composition, learning tasks, within group interaction and adult presence) and used as a basis to collect information on classroom groupings (using a novel classroom 'mapping' survey). Teachers in 187 classrooms from Years 2 and 5 were surveyed and undertook the mapping during normal classroom work time. The most common group size found was the small group of 4-6 pupils. Other group sizes, including whole classes, individuals, dyads, and triads were less frequent. Most pupil groupings were teacher designated and combined girls and boys of similar ability. Groupings mainly studied English and mathematics, and worked on individuated tasks involving the practice or revision of skills/knowledge. Adults were present with one-third of groupings - with particular adults interacting with particular types of groupings (low-ability boys, high-ability girls, and whole classes). When data from the themes are interrelated especially group size and composition with learning task and interaction type, many points of concern arise. Findings suggest that teachers may not think strategically about the size and composition of groupings in relation to the tasks assigned. Adult presence is associated with control of knowledge and behaviour, and different types of adults are associated with the support of groupings at different levels of ability. Teachers provide little training for children to develop group work skills, and offer little opportunity for these skills to be practised in the promotion of learning. The findings and discussion combine to identify that the area of 'social pedagogy of pupil grouping' is a new and legitimate concern, and that further (and more focused) research in the area should be undertaken.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/01411926.aspen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofBritish Educational Research Journalen_HK
dc.titlePupil groupings in primary school classrooms: Sites for learning and social pedagogy?en_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailKutnick, P: pkutnick@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityKutnick, P=rp01414en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/01411920120122149en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0036005488en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0036005488&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume28en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage187en_HK
dc.identifier.epage206en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000174958500004-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKutnick, P=6602743302en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBlatchford, P=7003974553en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBaines, E=7004063555en_HK

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