File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Nonsurgical management of acute and chronic low back pain

TitleNonsurgical management of acute and chronic low back pain
Authors
KeywordsReferences (96) View In Table Layout
Issue Date2006
PublisherAmerican Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.jaaos.org/
Citation
Journal Of The American Academy Of Orthopaedic Surgeons, 2006, v. 14 n. 8, p. 477-487 How to Cite?
AbstractA variety of nonsurgical treatment alternatives exists for acute and chronic low back pain. Patients should receive appropriate education about the favorable natural history of low back pain, basic body mechanics, and methods (eg, exercises, activity modification, behavioral modification) that can reduce symptoms. Nonprescription medication is efficacious for mild to moderate pain. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, alone or in combination with muscle relaxants, relieve pain and improve overall symptoms of acute low back pain. Exercise therapy has limited value for acute low back pain, but strong evidence supports exercise therapy in the management of chronic low back pain. Moderately strong evidence supports the use of manipulation in acute back pain. Evidence is weak for the use of epidural corticosteroid injections in patients with acute low back pain, strong for short-term relief of chronic low back pain, and limited for long-term relief of chronic low back pain. The use of facet injections in the management of acute low back pain is not supported by evidence, nor is the effectiveness of orthoses, traction, magnets, or acupuncture. Trigger point injections are not indicated for nonspecific acute or chronic low back pain, and sacroiliac joint injections are not indicated in the routine management of low back pain. Conflicting evidence exists regarding the use of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. Copyright 2006 by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/92935
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.055
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.674
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorShen, FHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSamartzis, Den_HK
dc.contributor.authorAndersson, GBJen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-22T05:04:16Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-22T05:04:16Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of The American Academy Of Orthopaedic Surgeons, 2006, v. 14 n. 8, p. 477-487en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1067-151Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/92935-
dc.description.abstractA variety of nonsurgical treatment alternatives exists for acute and chronic low back pain. Patients should receive appropriate education about the favorable natural history of low back pain, basic body mechanics, and methods (eg, exercises, activity modification, behavioral modification) that can reduce symptoms. Nonprescription medication is efficacious for mild to moderate pain. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, alone or in combination with muscle relaxants, relieve pain and improve overall symptoms of acute low back pain. Exercise therapy has limited value for acute low back pain, but strong evidence supports exercise therapy in the management of chronic low back pain. Moderately strong evidence supports the use of manipulation in acute back pain. Evidence is weak for the use of epidural corticosteroid injections in patients with acute low back pain, strong for short-term relief of chronic low back pain, and limited for long-term relief of chronic low back pain. The use of facet injections in the management of acute low back pain is not supported by evidence, nor is the effectiveness of orthoses, traction, magnets, or acupuncture. Trigger point injections are not indicated for nonspecific acute or chronic low back pain, and sacroiliac joint injections are not indicated in the routine management of low back pain. Conflicting evidence exists regarding the use of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. Copyright 2006 by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherAmerican Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.jaaos.org/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeonsen_HK
dc.subjectReferences (96) View In Table Layouten_HK
dc.titleNonsurgical management of acute and chronic low back painen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailSamartzis, D:dspine@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySamartzis, D=rp01430en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.pmid16885479-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33845509446en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33845509446&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume14en_HK
dc.identifier.issue8en_HK
dc.identifier.spage477en_HK
dc.identifier.epage487en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000239707500005-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridShen, FH=7201583245en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSamartzis, D=34572771100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAndersson, GBJ=7202646056en_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats