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Article: Cervical spondylotic myelopathy: The role of posterior decompression, arthrodesis, and instrumentation

TitleCervical spondylotic myelopathy: The role of posterior decompression, arthrodesis, and instrumentation
Authors
KeywordsCervical spine surgery
Cervical spondylotic myelopathy
Fusion
Laminectomy
Laminoplasty
Issue Date2003
PublisherThieme Medical Publishers. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.thieme.com//onGJMFKAEJLKFFK/display/768
Citation
Seminars In Neurosurgery, 2003, v. 14 n. 1, p. 21-29 How to Cite?
AbstractCervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) is an insidious, progressive disease process that presents with a number of symptoms frequently refractory to conservative non-operative treatments that often require operative intervention. Nevertheless, controversy exists over the optimal choice of surgical treatment for CSM. For patients with progressive symptoms despite nonoperative therapy, posterior decompression is an appropriate treatment option dependent upon location of pathology, extent of degenerative disease, and cervical alignment. Fusion and instrumentation is a further adjunct to posterior cervical decompression and has gained popularity as a method of maintaining cervical spine stability and alignment following decompression.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/92902
ISSN
2007 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.101
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSamartzis, Den_HK
dc.contributor.authorRatliff, JKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPerezCruet, MJen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-22T05:03:15Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-22T05:03:15Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_HK
dc.identifier.citationSeminars In Neurosurgery, 2003, v. 14 n. 1, p. 21-29en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1526-8012en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/92902-
dc.description.abstractCervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) is an insidious, progressive disease process that presents with a number of symptoms frequently refractory to conservative non-operative treatments that often require operative intervention. Nevertheless, controversy exists over the optimal choice of surgical treatment for CSM. For patients with progressive symptoms despite nonoperative therapy, posterior decompression is an appropriate treatment option dependent upon location of pathology, extent of degenerative disease, and cervical alignment. Fusion and instrumentation is a further adjunct to posterior cervical decompression and has gained popularity as a method of maintaining cervical spine stability and alignment following decompression.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherThieme Medical Publishers. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.thieme.com//onGJMFKAEJLKFFK/display/768en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofSeminars in Neurosurgeryen_HK
dc.subjectCervical spine surgeryen_HK
dc.subjectCervical spondylotic myelopathyen_HK
dc.subjectFusionen_HK
dc.subjectLaminectomyen_HK
dc.subjectLaminoplastyen_HK
dc.titleCervical spondylotic myelopathy: The role of posterior decompression, arthrodesis, and instrumentationen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailSamartzis, D:dspine@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySamartzis, D=rp01430en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0043239099en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0043239099&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume14en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage21en_HK
dc.identifier.epage29en_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSamartzis, D=34572771100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRatliff, JK=35480198000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPerezCruet, MJ=6603355445en_HK

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