File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Giant cell tumor of the lumbar spine: operative management via spondylectomy and short-segment, 3-column reconstruction with pedicle recreation

TitleGiant cell tumor of the lumbar spine: operative management via spondylectomy and short-segment, 3-column reconstruction with pedicle recreation
Authors
Keywords3-Column
Giant cell tumor
Instrumentation
Lumbar
Pedicle reconstruction
Short segment
Spondylectomy
Stackable carbon fiber cage
Issue Date2008
PublisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/surneu
Citation
Surgical Neurology, 2008, v. 69 n. 2, p. 138-141 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Giant cell tumors of the lumbar spine are uncommon lesions. Aggressive management of such lesions via spondylectomy to obtain local control and prevent recurrence is often necessary. Spinal reconstruction after total spondylectomy can be challenging. Traditional reconstructions typically require multisegment fixation with an association loss of segmental motion and limited 3-column reconstruction. Methods: The authors report a case of a GCT of the lumbar spine occurring in a 49-year-old woman. The authors describe the surgical management of such a lesion via a 1-stage posterior-anterior-posterior procedure that entails a lumbar spondylectomy and short-segment posterior fixation with 3-column reconstruction using a stackable carbon-fiber-reinforced cage device with direct posterior rod connection for pedicle reconstruction. Results: At 33 months postoperative follow-up, neither tumor recurrence nor instrumentation-related complications were noted, bone fusion was prevalent, and sagittal alignment was well maintained. The patient reported no loss of functions, was neurologically intact, and remained active. Conclusions: Aggressive operative management via spondylectomy of a lumbar GCT provides local tumor control. In select patients, spinal reconstruction after a spondylectomy via a 1-stage posterior-anterior-posterior approach to establish short-segment, 3-column reconstruction with recreation of the pedicles is a promising procedure that provides immediate spinal stabilization without evidence of early instrumentation-related complications, maintains spinal alignment, promotes a quick return to daily activities, and avoids sacrificing excessive motion segments and biomechanical function associated with more traditional procedures. © 2008 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/92893
ISSN
2011 Impact Factor: 1.669
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSamartzis, Den_HK
dc.contributor.authorFoster, WCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPadgett, Den_HK
dc.contributor.authorShen, FHen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-22T05:02:58Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-22T05:02:58Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationSurgical Neurology, 2008, v. 69 n. 2, p. 138-141en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0090-3019en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/92893-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Giant cell tumors of the lumbar spine are uncommon lesions. Aggressive management of such lesions via spondylectomy to obtain local control and prevent recurrence is often necessary. Spinal reconstruction after total spondylectomy can be challenging. Traditional reconstructions typically require multisegment fixation with an association loss of segmental motion and limited 3-column reconstruction. Methods: The authors report a case of a GCT of the lumbar spine occurring in a 49-year-old woman. The authors describe the surgical management of such a lesion via a 1-stage posterior-anterior-posterior procedure that entails a lumbar spondylectomy and short-segment posterior fixation with 3-column reconstruction using a stackable carbon-fiber-reinforced cage device with direct posterior rod connection for pedicle reconstruction. Results: At 33 months postoperative follow-up, neither tumor recurrence nor instrumentation-related complications were noted, bone fusion was prevalent, and sagittal alignment was well maintained. The patient reported no loss of functions, was neurologically intact, and remained active. Conclusions: Aggressive operative management via spondylectomy of a lumbar GCT provides local tumor control. In select patients, spinal reconstruction after a spondylectomy via a 1-stage posterior-anterior-posterior approach to establish short-segment, 3-column reconstruction with recreation of the pedicles is a promising procedure that provides immediate spinal stabilization without evidence of early instrumentation-related complications, maintains spinal alignment, promotes a quick return to daily activities, and avoids sacrificing excessive motion segments and biomechanical function associated with more traditional procedures. © 2008 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/surneuen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofSurgical Neurologyen_HK
dc.rightsSurgical Neurology. Copyright © Elsevier Inc.-
dc.subject3-Columnen_HK
dc.subjectGiant cell tumoren_HK
dc.subjectInstrumentationen_HK
dc.subjectLumbaren_HK
dc.subjectPedicle reconstructionen_HK
dc.subjectShort segmenten_HK
dc.subjectSpondylectomyen_HK
dc.subjectStackable carbon fiber cageen_HK
dc.subject.meshGiant cell tumor of bone - pathology - surgery-
dc.subject.meshLumbar vertebrae-
dc.subject.meshMiddle aged-
dc.subject.meshSpinal fusion - methods-
dc.subject.meshSpinal neoplasms - pathology - surgery-
dc.titleGiant cell tumor of the lumbar spine: operative management via spondylectomy and short-segment, 3-column reconstruction with pedicle recreationen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0090-3019&volume=69&issue=2&spage=138&epage=141&date=2008&atitle=Giant+cell+tumor+of+the+lumbar+spine:+operative+management+via+spondylectomy+and+short-segment,+3-column+reconstruction+with+pedicle+recreation-
dc.identifier.emailSamartzis, D:dspine@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySamartzis, D=rp01430en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.surneu.2007.01.038en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid17586008-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-38749147702en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros167461-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-38749147702&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume69en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage138en_HK
dc.identifier.epage141en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000253277800009-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSamartzis, D=34572771100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFoster, WC=7202606556en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPadgett, D=8308815100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridShen, FH=7201583245en_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats