File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Impact of marine fish farming on water quality and bottom sediment: A case study in the sub-tropical environment

TitleImpact of marine fish farming on water quality and bottom sediment: A case study in the sub-tropical environment
Authors
KeywordsAnimal Food
Aquaculture
Article
Benthos
Environmental Impact Assessment
Escherichia Coli
Eutrophication
Fish
Light
Marine Environment
Oxygen Consumption
Sediment
Suspended Particulate Matter
Tropic Climate
Water Quality
Issue Date1994
PublisherElsevier Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/marenvrev
Citation
Marine Environmental Research, 1994, v. 38 n. 2, p. 115-145 How to Cite?
AbstractField studies were carried out to determine and compare the impact of marine fish farming activities on the water quality and bottom sediment at four fish culture sites with different hydrographic and culture conditions in a sub-tropical environment where trash fish is used as feed. The major impact identified was on the sea bottom, resulting in the development of reducing and anoxic sediments, high sediment oxygen demand, production of hydrogen sulphide and elimination/decrease in benthos. The impact on water quality was less conspicuous. A decrease in dissolved oxygen was observed at all sites while increases in ammonia, inorganic P, nitrate and nitrite were observed only at sites with poor tidal flushing and high stocking density. However, no significant changes in total suspended solids, light extinction coefficient, chlorophyll a, phaeopigment and E. coli were found near the fish rafts at any sites. Environmental impacts vary considerably between sites, and were significantly reduced at sites with good water circulation and low stocking density. Despite the high organic and nutrient loadings generated by marine fish farming activities, the impacts on water quality and sediments at all sites were localised and did not appear to extend beyond a distance of 1-1.5 km from the fish rafts. Results of the present study also do not support the suggestion that marine fish farming activities have caused eutrophication on a large scale.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/92777
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.769
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.113
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWu, RSSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, KSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMacKay, DWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLau, TCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYam, Ven_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-17T10:56:51Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-17T10:56:51Z-
dc.date.issued1994en_HK
dc.identifier.citationMarine Environmental Research, 1994, v. 38 n. 2, p. 115-145en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0141-1136en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/92777-
dc.description.abstractField studies were carried out to determine and compare the impact of marine fish farming activities on the water quality and bottom sediment at four fish culture sites with different hydrographic and culture conditions in a sub-tropical environment where trash fish is used as feed. The major impact identified was on the sea bottom, resulting in the development of reducing and anoxic sediments, high sediment oxygen demand, production of hydrogen sulphide and elimination/decrease in benthos. The impact on water quality was less conspicuous. A decrease in dissolved oxygen was observed at all sites while increases in ammonia, inorganic P, nitrate and nitrite were observed only at sites with poor tidal flushing and high stocking density. However, no significant changes in total suspended solids, light extinction coefficient, chlorophyll a, phaeopigment and E. coli were found near the fish rafts at any sites. Environmental impacts vary considerably between sites, and were significantly reduced at sites with good water circulation and low stocking density. Despite the high organic and nutrient loadings generated by marine fish farming activities, the impacts on water quality and sediments at all sites were localised and did not appear to extend beyond a distance of 1-1.5 km from the fish rafts. Results of the present study also do not support the suggestion that marine fish farming activities have caused eutrophication on a large scale.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherElsevier Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/marenvreven_HK
dc.relation.ispartofMarine Environmental Researchen_HK
dc.subjectAnimal Fooden_HK
dc.subjectAquacultureen_HK
dc.subjectArticleen_HK
dc.subjectBenthosen_HK
dc.subjectEnvironmental Impact Assessmenten_HK
dc.subjectEscherichia Colien_HK
dc.subjectEutrophicationen_HK
dc.subjectFishen_HK
dc.subjectLighten_HK
dc.subjectMarine Environmenten_HK
dc.subjectOxygen Consumptionen_HK
dc.subjectSedimenten_HK
dc.subjectSuspended Particulate Matteren_HK
dc.subjectTropic Climateen_HK
dc.subjectWater Qualityen_HK
dc.titleImpact of marine fish farming on water quality and bottom sediment: A case study in the sub-tropical environmenten_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWu, RSS: rudolfwu@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailYam, V: wwyam@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWu, RSS=rp01398en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityYam, V=rp00822en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/0141-1136(94)90004-3en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0028183979en_HK
dc.identifier.volume38en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage115en_HK
dc.identifier.epage145en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1994NH97400004-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWu, RSS=7402945079en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, KS=7403657254en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMacKay, DW=7402241722en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, TC=7102222310en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYam, V=18539304700en_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats