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Article: Recolonization and succession of marine macrobenthos in organic-enriched sediment deposited from fish farms

TitleRecolonization and succession of marine macrobenthos in organic-enriched sediment deposited from fish farms
Authors
KeywordsBenthos
Marine fish culture
Recovery
Issue Date1998
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/envpol
Citation
Environmental Pollution, 1998, v. 101 n. 2, p. 241-251 How to Cite?
AbstractHigh organic loading deposited on the sea bottom by marine fish farming activities often eliminates benthic organisms in the vicinity. In this study, organic-enriched sediment collected underneath a fish farm was defaunated, placed in settling trays and exposed to the subtidal area of a clean site of similar hydrography. Trays were sampled monthly for a consecutive period of 5 months, and recolonization and successional patterns of macrobenthos were studied using univariate and multivariate statistics. Recolonization occurred rapidly, and averages of 144 animals/tray and 26 species/tray were recorded within the first month. Molluscs accounted for 49% of species and polychaetes for 77% of abundance during the first month of recolonization. Temporal changes in abundance, diversity and species composition found in subsequent months resembled spatial changes of benthic community along a decreasing pollution gradient generalised by Pearson and Rosenberg. Abundance reached a peak after 3 months (434 animals/tray) and then declined. Species number also increased, peaked after 4 months (47 species/tray), and was followed by a decrease. The polychaete Prionospio malmgreni succeeded Pseudopolydora paucibranchiata as the dominant species after the first month, reached a peak (194 animals/tray) after 3 months, then declined sharply. The rapid recolonization and succession of the macrobenthic community on organic-enriched sediment suggested that present fish farming methods are unlikely to have a long-term impact on benthic communities once farming activities are reduced/ceased.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/92765
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.839
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.045
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLu, Len_HK
dc.contributor.authorWu, RSSen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-17T10:56:30Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-17T10:56:30Z-
dc.date.issued1998en_HK
dc.identifier.citationEnvironmental Pollution, 1998, v. 101 n. 2, p. 241-251en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0269-7491en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/92765-
dc.description.abstractHigh organic loading deposited on the sea bottom by marine fish farming activities often eliminates benthic organisms in the vicinity. In this study, organic-enriched sediment collected underneath a fish farm was defaunated, placed in settling trays and exposed to the subtidal area of a clean site of similar hydrography. Trays were sampled monthly for a consecutive period of 5 months, and recolonization and successional patterns of macrobenthos were studied using univariate and multivariate statistics. Recolonization occurred rapidly, and averages of 144 animals/tray and 26 species/tray were recorded within the first month. Molluscs accounted for 49% of species and polychaetes for 77% of abundance during the first month of recolonization. Temporal changes in abundance, diversity and species composition found in subsequent months resembled spatial changes of benthic community along a decreasing pollution gradient generalised by Pearson and Rosenberg. Abundance reached a peak after 3 months (434 animals/tray) and then declined. Species number also increased, peaked after 4 months (47 species/tray), and was followed by a decrease. The polychaete Prionospio malmgreni succeeded Pseudopolydora paucibranchiata as the dominant species after the first month, reached a peak (194 animals/tray) after 3 months, then declined sharply. The rapid recolonization and succession of the macrobenthic community on organic-enriched sediment suggested that present fish farming methods are unlikely to have a long-term impact on benthic communities once farming activities are reduced/ceased.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/envpolen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofEnvironmental Pollutionen_HK
dc.subjectBenthosen_HK
dc.subjectMarine fish cultureen_HK
dc.subjectRecoveryen_HK
dc.titleRecolonization and succession of marine macrobenthos in organic-enriched sediment deposited from fish farmsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWu, RSS: rudolfwu@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWu, RSS=rp01398en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0269-7491(98)00041-4en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0031658564en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0031658564&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume101en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage241en_HK
dc.identifier.epage251en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000075904900010-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLu, L=55251239700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWu, RSS=7402945079en_HK

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