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Article: An experimental study on recolonization and succession of marine macrobenthos in defaunated sediment

TitleAn experimental study on recolonization and succession of marine macrobenthos in defaunated sediment
Authors
Issue Date2000
PublisherSpringer Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00227/index.htm
Citation
Marine Biology, 2000, v. 136 n. 2, p. 291-302 How to Cite?
AbstractHypoxia/anoxia in coastal waters is a world wide problem which often results in mass mortality and defaunation of benthos. In this study, field experiments were carried out to examine recolonization and succession of macrobenthic infauna in defaunated sediments, and the time required for recovery from complete defaunation to a stable community. Trays (33 cm length x 25.5 cm width x 11 cm depth) of defaunated sediment were exposed at the subtidal of a pristine site in subtropical Hong Kong. Temporal changes of macrobenthic communities in defaunated sediment were analyzed by univariate and multivariate statistics, and compared with those in undisturbed natural sediment at the same site. Initial colonization of macrobenthos occurred rapidly. A total of 42 species was found, with an average of 258 animals per tray and 24 species per tray recorded in the first month. Abundance showed a small peak (496 animals per tray) after 3 months, reached a sharp peak (1154 animals per tray) after 6 months, and declined thereafter. Species number increased gradually, reached a maximum (68 species per tray) after 9 months, and then decreased. Recolonization was predominantly contributed by larval settlement rather than adult migration. Temporal changes in abundance, species number and diversity of the macrobenthic community in defaunated sediment resemble the spatial changes along a decreasing pollution gradient previously defined by other authors. Results of this experiment suggest that newly available sediment may allow more species to colonize (or coexist) than sediment pre-occupied by an established community. This is probably due to less interspecific competition in the former habitat. No significant difference in abundance or species richness was observed between defaunated and natural sediments after 15 months, suggesting that a stable community had been achieved, although minor variations in species composition were still discernible between defaunated and natural sediments.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/92751
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.375
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.302
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLu, Len_HK
dc.contributor.authorWu, RSSen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-17T10:56:06Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-17T10:56:06Z-
dc.date.issued2000en_HK
dc.identifier.citationMarine Biology, 2000, v. 136 n. 2, p. 291-302en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0025-3162en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/92751-
dc.description.abstractHypoxia/anoxia in coastal waters is a world wide problem which often results in mass mortality and defaunation of benthos. In this study, field experiments were carried out to examine recolonization and succession of macrobenthic infauna in defaunated sediments, and the time required for recovery from complete defaunation to a stable community. Trays (33 cm length x 25.5 cm width x 11 cm depth) of defaunated sediment were exposed at the subtidal of a pristine site in subtropical Hong Kong. Temporal changes of macrobenthic communities in defaunated sediment were analyzed by univariate and multivariate statistics, and compared with those in undisturbed natural sediment at the same site. Initial colonization of macrobenthos occurred rapidly. A total of 42 species was found, with an average of 258 animals per tray and 24 species per tray recorded in the first month. Abundance showed a small peak (496 animals per tray) after 3 months, reached a sharp peak (1154 animals per tray) after 6 months, and declined thereafter. Species number increased gradually, reached a maximum (68 species per tray) after 9 months, and then decreased. Recolonization was predominantly contributed by larval settlement rather than adult migration. Temporal changes in abundance, species number and diversity of the macrobenthic community in defaunated sediment resemble the spatial changes along a decreasing pollution gradient previously defined by other authors. Results of this experiment suggest that newly available sediment may allow more species to colonize (or coexist) than sediment pre-occupied by an established community. This is probably due to less interspecific competition in the former habitat. No significant difference in abundance or species richness was observed between defaunated and natural sediments after 15 months, suggesting that a stable community had been achieved, although minor variations in species composition were still discernible between defaunated and natural sediments.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherSpringer Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00227/index.htmen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofMarine Biologyen_HK
dc.titleAn experimental study on recolonization and succession of marine macrobenthos in defaunated sedimenten_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWu, RSS: rudolfwu@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWu, RSS=rp01398en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0034030945en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0034030945&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume136en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage291en_HK
dc.identifier.epage302en_HK
dc.publisher.placeGermanyen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLu, L=55251239700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWu, RSS=7402945079en_HK

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