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Article: Growth and survival of juvenile barnacle Balanus amphitrite: Interactive effects of cyprid energy reserve and habitat

TitleGrowth and survival of juvenile barnacle Balanus amphitrite: Interactive effects of cyprid energy reserve and habitat
Authors
KeywordsBalanus amphitrite
Barnacles
Cyprid energy reserve
Food availability
Juvenile growth
Juvenile survival
Larval nutritional condition
Issue Date2005
PublisherInter-Research. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.int-res.com/journals/meps/index.html
Citation
Marine Ecology Progress Series, 2005, v. 299, p. 229-237 How to Cite?
AbstractUsing factorial laboratory and field-transplant experiments, we have examined the effects of cyprid energy reserve and habitat on the performance of juvenile Balanus amphitrite. The cyprid energy reserve (quantified as total lipid content) increased linearly with increasing food (the diatom Chaetoceros gracilis) concentrations, i.e. cyprids from nauplii fed the highest (1 × 106 cells ml-1), high (5 × 105 cells ml-1), low (1 × 105 cells ml-1) and the lowest (5 × 104 cells ml-1) food concentrations had the highest (0.81 μg cyprid-1), high (0.65 μg cyprid -1), low (0.45 pg cyprid-1) and the lowest (0.18 μg cyprid-1) energy reserves, respectively. These cyprids were induced to metamorphose in the laboratory and then transplanted to 4 field sites differing in food availability. Their performance (measured as growth and survival) was assessed on Day 6. Regardless of the site, both survival and growth were lower for juveniles obtained from cyprids with the lowest energy reserve compared with juveniles obtained from cyprids with low, high and the highest energy reserves. However, the magnitude of the effect of cyprid energy reserve on growth varied among sites. For example, juveniles obtained from cyprids with the lowest energy reserve grew larger (∼2- to 3-fold) at sites with a high chlorophyll a and low C/N ratio (indicators of surplus and high-quality food) than their siblings at other sites. This was interpreted as the result of the interaction between the negative effects of the lowest energy reserve in cyprids and the positive effect of surplus food. Adverse effects of the lowest energy reserve in cyprids on juvenile growth, however, could not be completely compensated by surplus food. Regardless of the cyprid energy reserve, juvenile growth (not survival) increased as chlorophyll a increased. This study suggests that the in situ growth of juvenile barnacles may depend on both independent and interactive effects of cyprid energy reserve (larval nutritional condition) and habitat. © Inter-Research 2005.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/92705
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.361
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.554
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorThiyagarajan, Ven_HK
dc.contributor.authorHung, OSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChiu, JMYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWu, RSSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorQian, PYen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-17T10:54:45Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-17T10:54:45Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_HK
dc.identifier.citationMarine Ecology Progress Series, 2005, v. 299, p. 229-237en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0171-8630en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/92705-
dc.description.abstractUsing factorial laboratory and field-transplant experiments, we have examined the effects of cyprid energy reserve and habitat on the performance of juvenile Balanus amphitrite. The cyprid energy reserve (quantified as total lipid content) increased linearly with increasing food (the diatom Chaetoceros gracilis) concentrations, i.e. cyprids from nauplii fed the highest (1 × 106 cells ml-1), high (5 × 105 cells ml-1), low (1 × 105 cells ml-1) and the lowest (5 × 104 cells ml-1) food concentrations had the highest (0.81 μg cyprid-1), high (0.65 μg cyprid -1), low (0.45 pg cyprid-1) and the lowest (0.18 μg cyprid-1) energy reserves, respectively. These cyprids were induced to metamorphose in the laboratory and then transplanted to 4 field sites differing in food availability. Their performance (measured as growth and survival) was assessed on Day 6. Regardless of the site, both survival and growth were lower for juveniles obtained from cyprids with the lowest energy reserve compared with juveniles obtained from cyprids with low, high and the highest energy reserves. However, the magnitude of the effect of cyprid energy reserve on growth varied among sites. For example, juveniles obtained from cyprids with the lowest energy reserve grew larger (∼2- to 3-fold) at sites with a high chlorophyll a and low C/N ratio (indicators of surplus and high-quality food) than their siblings at other sites. This was interpreted as the result of the interaction between the negative effects of the lowest energy reserve in cyprids and the positive effect of surplus food. Adverse effects of the lowest energy reserve in cyprids on juvenile growth, however, could not be completely compensated by surplus food. Regardless of the cyprid energy reserve, juvenile growth (not survival) increased as chlorophyll a increased. This study suggests that the in situ growth of juvenile barnacles may depend on both independent and interactive effects of cyprid energy reserve (larval nutritional condition) and habitat. © Inter-Research 2005.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherInter-Research. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.int-res.com/journals/meps/index.htmlen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofMarine Ecology Progress Seriesen_HK
dc.subjectBalanus amphitriteen_HK
dc.subjectBarnaclesen_HK
dc.subjectCyprid energy reserveen_HK
dc.subjectFood availabilityen_HK
dc.subjectJuvenile growthen_HK
dc.subjectJuvenile survivalen_HK
dc.subjectLarval nutritional conditionen_HK
dc.titleGrowth and survival of juvenile barnacle Balanus amphitrite: Interactive effects of cyprid energy reserve and habitaten_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailThiyagarajan, V: rajan@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChiu, JMY: jillchiu@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWu, RSS: rudolfwu@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityThiyagarajan, V=rp00796en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChiu, JMY=rp01325en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWu, RSS=rp01398en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-26244433534en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-26244433534&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume299en_HK
dc.identifier.spage229en_HK
dc.identifier.epage237en_HK
dc.publisher.placeGermanyen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridThiyagarajan, V=6602476830en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHung, OS=8652904500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChiu, JMY=8833480800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWu, RSS=7402945079en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridQian, PY=35240648600en_HK

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