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Article: Effects of 20 PBDE metabolites on steroidogenesis in the H295R cell line

TitleEffects of 20 PBDE metabolites on steroidogenesis in the H295R cell line
Authors
KeywordsPBDE metabolites
Steroidogenesis
The H295R cell line
Issue Date2008
PublisherElsevier Ireland Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/toxlet
Citation
Toxicology Letters, 2008, v. 176 n. 3, p. 230-238 How to Cite?
Abstract
Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are additive flame retardants that have been found in the environment as well as human tissues. Environmental concentrations of these compounds have been increasing in many parts of the world in recent years. Due to their structural similarity, PBDEs are believed to have similar toxicity to PCBs, but their toxicological properties are still being determined. In this study, the steroidogenic effects of hydroxylated, methoxylated and/or chlorinated derivatives of PBDEs were assessed at both the gene and enzyme/hormone levels in the H295R human adrenocortical carcinoma cell line. The expression levels of 10 steroidogenic genes were measured using quantitative real-time PCR (Q-RT-PCR). Aromatase activity in the cells and sex steroid (testosterone (T) and 17β-estradiol (E2)) concentrations in the culture medium were also measured. CYP11B2, which regulates the synthesis of aldosterone, was the most sensitive gene and was induced by most of the compounds tested in this study. CYP19 gene expression, aromatase activity, and E2 production were also affected by several metabolites, but no consistent relationship was observed between these endpoints. Several PBDE metabolites showed some potential ability to interfere with steroidogenesis, including 5-Cl-6-OH-BDE-47, a biologically relevant BDE-47 metabolite, which significantly decreased aromatase activity and E2 production at a concentration of 10 μM. The results of this study indicate that PBDE metabolites affect steroidogenesis in vitro and that they may have the potential to affect steroidogenesis and reproduction in whole organisms. © 2007 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/92699
ISSN
2013 Impact Factor: 3.355
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.098
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

Author Affiliations
  1. University of Saskatchewan
  2. ENTRIX Inc.
  3. City University of Hong Kong
  4. National Food Safety and Toxicology Center
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHe, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMurphy, MBen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYu, RMKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, MHWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHecker, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorGiesy, JPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWu, RSSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, PKSen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-17T10:54:34Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-17T10:54:34Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationToxicology Letters, 2008, v. 176 n. 3, p. 230-238en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0378-4274en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/92699-
dc.description.abstractPolybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are additive flame retardants that have been found in the environment as well as human tissues. Environmental concentrations of these compounds have been increasing in many parts of the world in recent years. Due to their structural similarity, PBDEs are believed to have similar toxicity to PCBs, but their toxicological properties are still being determined. In this study, the steroidogenic effects of hydroxylated, methoxylated and/or chlorinated derivatives of PBDEs were assessed at both the gene and enzyme/hormone levels in the H295R human adrenocortical carcinoma cell line. The expression levels of 10 steroidogenic genes were measured using quantitative real-time PCR (Q-RT-PCR). Aromatase activity in the cells and sex steroid (testosterone (T) and 17β-estradiol (E2)) concentrations in the culture medium were also measured. CYP11B2, which regulates the synthesis of aldosterone, was the most sensitive gene and was induced by most of the compounds tested in this study. CYP19 gene expression, aromatase activity, and E2 production were also affected by several metabolites, but no consistent relationship was observed between these endpoints. Several PBDE metabolites showed some potential ability to interfere with steroidogenesis, including 5-Cl-6-OH-BDE-47, a biologically relevant BDE-47 metabolite, which significantly decreased aromatase activity and E2 production at a concentration of 10 μM. The results of this study indicate that PBDE metabolites affect steroidogenesis in vitro and that they may have the potential to affect steroidogenesis and reproduction in whole organisms. © 2007 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherElsevier Ireland Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/toxleten_HK
dc.relation.ispartofToxicology Lettersen_HK
dc.subjectPBDE metabolitesen_HK
dc.subjectSteroidogenesisen_HK
dc.subjectThe H295R cell lineen_HK
dc.titleEffects of 20 PBDE metabolites on steroidogenesis in the H295R cell lineen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWu, RSS: rudolfwu@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWu, RSS=rp01398en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.toxlet.2007.12.001en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid18248924en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-38749113896en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-38749113896&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume176en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage230en_HK
dc.identifier.epage238en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000254076700008-
dc.publisher.placeIrelanden_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHe, Y=16241582000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMurphy, MB=7403900446en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYu, RMK=9278574900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, MHW=7202630175en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHecker, M=35247848500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGiesy, JP=35459135300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWu, RSS=7402945079en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, PKS=7202365776en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike9570974-

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