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Article: Assessment of the effects of chemicals on the expression of ten steroidogenic genes in the H295R cell line using real-time PCR
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TitleAssessment of the effects of chemicals on the expression of ten steroidogenic genes in the H295R cell line using real-time PCR
 
AuthorsHilscherova, K1
Jones, PD1
Gracia, T1
Newsted, JL2
Zhang, X1 3
Sanderson, JT4
Yu, RMK3
Wu, RSS3
Giesy, JP1 3
 
KeywordsBioassay
Screening
Steroidogenesis
Xenoestrogens
 
Issue Date2004
 
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://toxsci.oxfordjournals.org/
 
CitationToxicological Sciences, 2004, v. 81 n. 1, p. 78-89 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/toxsci/kfh191
 
AbstractThe potential for a variety of environmental contaminants to disturb endocrine function in wildlife and humans has been of recent concern. While much effort is being focused on the assessment of effects mediated through steroid hormone receptor-based mechanisms, there are potentially several other mechanisms that could lead to endocrine disruption. Recent studies have demonstrated that a variety of xenobiotics can alter the gene expression or activity of enzymes involved in steroidogenesis. By altering the production or catalytic activity of steroidogenic or steroid-catabolizing enzymes, these chemicals have the potential to alter the steroid balance in organisms. To assess the potential of chemicals to alter steroidogenesis, an assay system was developed using a human adrenocortical carcinoma cell line, the H295R cell line, which retains the ability to synthesize most of the important steroidogenic enzymes. Methods were developed, optimized, and validated to measure the expression of 10 genes involved in steroidogenesis by the use of real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR. The effects of several model chemicals known to alter steroid metabolism, both inducers and inhibitors, were assessed. Similar expression patterns were observed for chemicals acting through common mechanisms of action. Time-course studies demonstrated distinct time-dependent expression profiles for chemicals able to modulate steroid metabolism. The assay, which allows simultaneous analysis of the expression of numerous steroidogenic enzymes, would be useful as a sensitive and integrative screen for the many effects of chemicals on steroidogenesis. © Society of Toxicology 2004; all rights reserved.
 
ISSN1096-6080
2013 Impact Factor: 4.478
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.712
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1093/toxsci/kfh191
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000223589100011
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorHilscherova, K
 
dc.contributor.authorJones, PD
 
dc.contributor.authorGracia, T
 
dc.contributor.authorNewsted, JL
 
dc.contributor.authorZhang, X
 
dc.contributor.authorSanderson, JT
 
dc.contributor.authorYu, RMK
 
dc.contributor.authorWu, RSS
 
dc.contributor.authorGiesy, JP
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-17T10:54:28Z
 
dc.date.available2010-09-17T10:54:28Z
 
dc.date.issued2004
 
dc.description.abstractThe potential for a variety of environmental contaminants to disturb endocrine function in wildlife and humans has been of recent concern. While much effort is being focused on the assessment of effects mediated through steroid hormone receptor-based mechanisms, there are potentially several other mechanisms that could lead to endocrine disruption. Recent studies have demonstrated that a variety of xenobiotics can alter the gene expression or activity of enzymes involved in steroidogenesis. By altering the production or catalytic activity of steroidogenic or steroid-catabolizing enzymes, these chemicals have the potential to alter the steroid balance in organisms. To assess the potential of chemicals to alter steroidogenesis, an assay system was developed using a human adrenocortical carcinoma cell line, the H295R cell line, which retains the ability to synthesize most of the important steroidogenic enzymes. Methods were developed, optimized, and validated to measure the expression of 10 genes involved in steroidogenesis by the use of real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR. The effects of several model chemicals known to alter steroid metabolism, both inducers and inhibitors, were assessed. Similar expression patterns were observed for chemicals acting through common mechanisms of action. Time-course studies demonstrated distinct time-dependent expression profiles for chemicals able to modulate steroid metabolism. The assay, which allows simultaneous analysis of the expression of numerous steroidogenic enzymes, would be useful as a sensitive and integrative screen for the many effects of chemicals on steroidogenesis. © Society of Toxicology 2004; all rights reserved.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationToxicological Sciences, 2004, v. 81 n. 1, p. 78-89 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/toxsci/kfh191
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1093/toxsci/kfh191
 
dc.identifier.epage89
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000223589100011
 
dc.identifier.issn1096-6080
2013 Impact Factor: 4.478
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.712
 
dc.identifier.issue1
 
dc.identifier.pmid15187238
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-4444240722
 
dc.identifier.spage78
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/92696
 
dc.identifier.volume81
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://toxsci.oxfordjournals.org/
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofToxicological Sciences
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subjectBioassay
 
dc.subjectScreening
 
dc.subjectSteroidogenesis
 
dc.subjectXenoestrogens
 
dc.titleAssessment of the effects of chemicals on the expression of ten steroidogenic genes in the H295R cell line using real-time PCR
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Sanderson, JT</contributor.author>
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Author Affiliations
  1. Michigan State University
  2. ENTRIX Inc.
  3. City University of Hong Kong
  4. Utrecht University