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Article: Effects of PCBs and MeSO2-PCBs on adrenocortical steroidogenesis in H295R human adrenocortical carcinoma cells

TitleEffects of PCBs and MeSO2-PCBs on adrenocortical steroidogenesis in H295R human adrenocortical carcinoma cells
Authors
KeywordsH295R
MeSO2-PCBs
Polychlorinated biphenyls
Steroidogenesis
Issue Date2006
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/chemosphere
Citation
Chemosphere, 2006, v. 63 n. 5, p. 772-784 How to Cite?
AbstractSome endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in the environment have been shown to exert their biological effects through interference with steroidogenesis. In this study, the potential effects of four selected polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners (PCB101, PCB110, PCB126 and PCB149) as well as several of their environmentally-relevant methylsulfonyl-(MeSO2-) PCB metabolites (3′-MeSO2-CB101, 4′-MeSO2-CB101, 4′-MeSO2-CB110, 3′-MeSO2-CB149 and 4′-MeSO2-CB149) on adrenocortical steroidogenesis were evaluated by in vitro bioassay based on the human adrenocortical carcinoma H295R cell line. The PCBs included in the study represented different structures and potential mechanisms of action. Cells were exposed for 48 h to 10 μM of each PCB congener in the presence or absence of 20% (w/w) of their corresponding MeSO2-PCB metabolite(s). After the chemical treatments, changes in mRNA expression of 11 steroidogenic genes (CYP11A, CYP11B1, CYP11B2, CYP17, CYP19, CYP21, 3β-HSD1, 3β-HSD2, 17β-HSD1, StAR and HMGR) were quantified using molecular beacon-based real-time RT-PCR. Genes coding for enzymes involved in the later or final steps of steroid production (CYP11B1, CYP11B2, CYP19, 3β-HSD1, 3β-HSD2 and 17β-HSD1) were up-regulated to various extents by most PCBs. The greatest transcriptional activations (2.8-29.9-fold) were elicited by PCB110 on CYP11B1, CYP11B2, 3β-HSD2 and CYP19, and PCB149 on CYP11B1, 3β-HSD1 and 17β-HSD1. Increased expression of these steroidogenic genes might ultimately lead to a change in hormonal balance through excessive production of steroid hormones including aldosterone, cortisol and estradiol. In addition, co-treatment with 3′- and 4′-MeSO2-PCB149 resulted in a significant decrease in PCB149-induced 3β-HSD1 and 17β-HSD1 expression. This result indicates that some PCB congeners and their MeSO2-metabolites may affect steroidogenesis via different mechanisms. Overall, these findings suggest that PCBs and PCB metabolites can affect regulation of adrenocortical steroidogenesis. © 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/92691
ISSN
2014 Impact Factor: 3.340
2014 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.409
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorXu, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYu, RMKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Xen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMurphy, MBen_HK
dc.contributor.authorGiesy, JPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, MHWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, PKSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWu, RSSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYu, Hen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-17T10:54:19Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-17T10:54:19Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationChemosphere, 2006, v. 63 n. 5, p. 772-784en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0045-6535en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/92691-
dc.description.abstractSome endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in the environment have been shown to exert their biological effects through interference with steroidogenesis. In this study, the potential effects of four selected polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners (PCB101, PCB110, PCB126 and PCB149) as well as several of their environmentally-relevant methylsulfonyl-(MeSO2-) PCB metabolites (3′-MeSO2-CB101, 4′-MeSO2-CB101, 4′-MeSO2-CB110, 3′-MeSO2-CB149 and 4′-MeSO2-CB149) on adrenocortical steroidogenesis were evaluated by in vitro bioassay based on the human adrenocortical carcinoma H295R cell line. The PCBs included in the study represented different structures and potential mechanisms of action. Cells were exposed for 48 h to 10 μM of each PCB congener in the presence or absence of 20% (w/w) of their corresponding MeSO2-PCB metabolite(s). After the chemical treatments, changes in mRNA expression of 11 steroidogenic genes (CYP11A, CYP11B1, CYP11B2, CYP17, CYP19, CYP21, 3β-HSD1, 3β-HSD2, 17β-HSD1, StAR and HMGR) were quantified using molecular beacon-based real-time RT-PCR. Genes coding for enzymes involved in the later or final steps of steroid production (CYP11B1, CYP11B2, CYP19, 3β-HSD1, 3β-HSD2 and 17β-HSD1) were up-regulated to various extents by most PCBs. The greatest transcriptional activations (2.8-29.9-fold) were elicited by PCB110 on CYP11B1, CYP11B2, 3β-HSD2 and CYP19, and PCB149 on CYP11B1, 3β-HSD1 and 17β-HSD1. Increased expression of these steroidogenic genes might ultimately lead to a change in hormonal balance through excessive production of steroid hormones including aldosterone, cortisol and estradiol. In addition, co-treatment with 3′- and 4′-MeSO2-PCB149 resulted in a significant decrease in PCB149-induced 3β-HSD1 and 17β-HSD1 expression. This result indicates that some PCB congeners and their MeSO2-metabolites may affect steroidogenesis via different mechanisms. Overall, these findings suggest that PCBs and PCB metabolites can affect regulation of adrenocortical steroidogenesis. © 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/chemosphereen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofChemosphereen_HK
dc.subjectH295Ren_HK
dc.subjectMeSO2-PCBsen_HK
dc.subjectPolychlorinated biphenylsen_HK
dc.subjectSteroidogenesisen_HK
dc.titleEffects of PCBs and MeSO2-PCBs on adrenocortical steroidogenesis in H295R human adrenocortical carcinoma cellsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWu, RSS: rudolfwu@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWu, RSS=rp01398en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.chemosphere.2005.08.013en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid16216300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33646066554en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33646066554&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume63en_HK
dc.identifier.issue5en_HK
dc.identifier.spage772en_HK
dc.identifier.epage784en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000237648900008-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridXu, Y=7406447308en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYu, RMK=9278574900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, X=8606600100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMurphy, MB=7403900446en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGiesy, JP=35459135300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, MHW=7202630175en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, PKS=7202365776en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWu, RSS=7402945079en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYu, H=7405852208en_HK

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