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Article: Transplant experiments on growth and mortality of the fan mussel Pinna bicolor

TitleTransplant experiments on growth and mortality of the fan mussel Pinna bicolor
Authors
KeywordsGrowth
Mortality
Pinna bicolor
Issue Date1998
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/aquaculture
Citation
Aquaculture, 1998, v. 163 n. 1-2, p. 47-62 How to Cite?
AbstractGrowth and mortality for different size classes (30-49 mm, 50-79 mm and 80-100 mm shell width) of the fan mussel Pinna bicolor transplanted at open sea bottom, within enclosure cages, and on suspended rafts were studied and compared over an 18-month study period. Growth, in terms of shell width, dry tissue weight and condition index of the same size class, did not show significant differences (P > 0.05) between the transplanted populations at the open sea bottom and in enclosure cages. Fastest growth was noted for the small-size class during the initial 12-month period, with a net increase in maximum shell width of 50-60 mm (100-120 mm shell length). Thereafter, growth tended to slow down and all growth parameters became similar for all the three size classes. In comparison of the small-size fan mussels between the bottom (open and caged) transplants and that on the suspended rafts, a better growth result was registered in the suspended raft population possibly due to a faster induced flow and availability of food in the water column. Mortality of transplanted P. bicolor was the highest at open sea bottom, and predominantly caused by predation by fish and crabs. Highest mortality was also noted in the small-size class as the larger fan mussels were less vulnerable to predation than the small juvenile. The number of transplanted P, bicolor at open sea bottom fell to the same natural density within the fast 12 months of the study and stabilized afterwards, suggesting that the natural population of P. bicolor was controlled by its predators. In rearing of fan mussels, both growth and mortality should be considered in concert, so as to select an optimal size class of transplants which would attain the maximum growth, with minimum mortality, over the culture period.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/92679
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.893
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.110
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWu, RSSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorShin, PKSen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-17T10:53:57Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-17T10:53:57Z-
dc.date.issued1998en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAquaculture, 1998, v. 163 n. 1-2, p. 47-62en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0044-8486en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/92679-
dc.description.abstractGrowth and mortality for different size classes (30-49 mm, 50-79 mm and 80-100 mm shell width) of the fan mussel Pinna bicolor transplanted at open sea bottom, within enclosure cages, and on suspended rafts were studied and compared over an 18-month study period. Growth, in terms of shell width, dry tissue weight and condition index of the same size class, did not show significant differences (P > 0.05) between the transplanted populations at the open sea bottom and in enclosure cages. Fastest growth was noted for the small-size class during the initial 12-month period, with a net increase in maximum shell width of 50-60 mm (100-120 mm shell length). Thereafter, growth tended to slow down and all growth parameters became similar for all the three size classes. In comparison of the small-size fan mussels between the bottom (open and caged) transplants and that on the suspended rafts, a better growth result was registered in the suspended raft population possibly due to a faster induced flow and availability of food in the water column. Mortality of transplanted P. bicolor was the highest at open sea bottom, and predominantly caused by predation by fish and crabs. Highest mortality was also noted in the small-size class as the larger fan mussels were less vulnerable to predation than the small juvenile. The number of transplanted P, bicolor at open sea bottom fell to the same natural density within the fast 12 months of the study and stabilized afterwards, suggesting that the natural population of P. bicolor was controlled by its predators. In rearing of fan mussels, both growth and mortality should be considered in concert, so as to select an optimal size class of transplants which would attain the maximum growth, with minimum mortality, over the culture period.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/aquacultureen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAquacultureen_HK
dc.subjectGrowthen_HK
dc.subjectMortalityen_HK
dc.subjectPinna bicoloren_HK
dc.titleTransplant experiments on growth and mortality of the fan mussel Pinna bicoloren_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWu, RSS: rudolfwu@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWu, RSS=rp01398en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0044-8486(98)00218-Xen_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0032052214en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0032052214&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume163en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1-2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage47en_HK
dc.identifier.epage62en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000074506500004-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWu, RSS=7402945079en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridShin, PKS=7004445653en_HK

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