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Article: Sediment characteristics and colonization of soft-bottom benthos: A field manipulation experiment

TitleSediment characteristics and colonization of soft-bottom benthos: A field manipulation experiment
Authors
Issue Date1997
PublisherSpringer Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00227/index.htm
Citation
Marine Biology, 1997, v. 128 n. 3, p. 475-487 How to Cite?
AbstractA field manipulation experiment was carried out to test the effects of sediment characteristics (particle size and organic content) on colonization of soft-bottom benthos. Defaunated mud and sand in experimental trays were exposed at sub-tidal levels of two sites with sandy and muddy sea bottom, and retrieved monthly for examination of benthic composition. Seventy-eight out of the 107 species recorded, and 50% of the dominant species identified in the present study, were common in both the sand and mud trays. Classification analysis revealed higher faunal similarity of benthic composition in both sediment types within each of the two study sites. Results of three-way ANOVA (Sediment, Site and Time) showed that sediment effect was only significant for colonization of bivalves and gastropods, but not for polychaetes, amphipods, total species and individual numbers, or overall benthic diversity and evenness. This suggested that many of the benthic species can colonize both sediment types, and that factors other than sediment particle size and organic content may play a significant role in determining colonization of these species. The faunal composition of the same sediment type between sites was found to be different, indicating that the availability and abundance of benthic larvae/adults may be more important than sediment characteristics in determining benthic settlement. An increase in faunal similarity between mud and sand was observed over the study period, implying that the importance of sediment characteristics to benthic colonization decreased with exposure time.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/92670
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.375
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.302
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWu, RSSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorShin, PKSen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-17T10:53:40Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-17T10:53:40Z-
dc.date.issued1997en_HK
dc.identifier.citationMarine Biology, 1997, v. 128 n. 3, p. 475-487en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0025-3162en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/92670-
dc.description.abstractA field manipulation experiment was carried out to test the effects of sediment characteristics (particle size and organic content) on colonization of soft-bottom benthos. Defaunated mud and sand in experimental trays were exposed at sub-tidal levels of two sites with sandy and muddy sea bottom, and retrieved monthly for examination of benthic composition. Seventy-eight out of the 107 species recorded, and 50% of the dominant species identified in the present study, were common in both the sand and mud trays. Classification analysis revealed higher faunal similarity of benthic composition in both sediment types within each of the two study sites. Results of three-way ANOVA (Sediment, Site and Time) showed that sediment effect was only significant for colonization of bivalves and gastropods, but not for polychaetes, amphipods, total species and individual numbers, or overall benthic diversity and evenness. This suggested that many of the benthic species can colonize both sediment types, and that factors other than sediment particle size and organic content may play a significant role in determining colonization of these species. The faunal composition of the same sediment type between sites was found to be different, indicating that the availability and abundance of benthic larvae/adults may be more important than sediment characteristics in determining benthic settlement. An increase in faunal similarity between mud and sand was observed over the study period, implying that the importance of sediment characteristics to benthic colonization decreased with exposure time.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherSpringer Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00227/index.htmen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofMarine Biologyen_HK
dc.titleSediment characteristics and colonization of soft-bottom benthos: A field manipulation experimenten_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWu, RSS: rudolfwu@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWu, RSS=rp01398en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s002270050114en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0030609587en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0030609587&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume128en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage475en_HK
dc.identifier.epage487en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1997XE76500014-
dc.publisher.placeGermanyen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWu, RSS=7402945079en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridShin, PKS=7004445653en_HK

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