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Article: Are universal standards for optimal infant growth appropriate? Evidence from a Hong Kong Chinese birth cohort

TitleAre universal standards for optimal infant growth appropriate? Evidence from a Hong Kong Chinese birth cohort
Authors
Issue Date2008
PublisherBMJ Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.archdischild.com/
Citation
Archives Of Disease In Childhood, 2008, v. 93 n. 7, p. 561-565 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: In 2006 the World Health Organization (WHO) published new optimal growth standards for all healthy infants worldwide. To assess their general applicability to a recently transitioned Chinese population, we compared them with infant growth patterns in a representative sample of Hong Kong infants. Design and settings: Weight at birth and at 1, 3, 9, 12, 18 and 36 months, length at 3 and 9 months and height at 36 months were obtained for over 80% of all infants born in April and May 1997 (3880 boys and 3536 girls). Age and sex specific z scores were calculated relative to the WHO growth standards for term singletons. Results: Weight for age was close to the 50th percentile of the WHO growth standards for both boys (mean z score: 0.00) and girls (0.04) at most time points before 3 years of age. However, our participants were shorter at 3 years, where the z scores in height were -0.34 and -0.38 for boys and girls, respectively. Restricting the analysis to a subset matching the WHO criteria for healthy infants without restrictions on growth gave similar results. Conclusions: Although the WHO study group concluded there was a striking similarity in length/height among different populations, Hong Kong Chinese toddlers are, on average, shorter. Epigenetic constraints on growth coupled with the rapid epidemiological transition in Hong Kong may not have allowed sufficient generations for infants and children to reach their full genetic height potential, and with it the WHO standards. A universal infant growth standard may not be appropriate across all populations.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/92583
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.231
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.118
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHui, LLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSchooling, CMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCowling, BJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, SSLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-17T10:50:48Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-17T10:50:48Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationArchives Of Disease In Childhood, 2008, v. 93 n. 7, p. 561-565en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0003-9888en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/92583-
dc.description.abstractObjective: In 2006 the World Health Organization (WHO) published new optimal growth standards for all healthy infants worldwide. To assess their general applicability to a recently transitioned Chinese population, we compared them with infant growth patterns in a representative sample of Hong Kong infants. Design and settings: Weight at birth and at 1, 3, 9, 12, 18 and 36 months, length at 3 and 9 months and height at 36 months were obtained for over 80% of all infants born in April and May 1997 (3880 boys and 3536 girls). Age and sex specific z scores were calculated relative to the WHO growth standards for term singletons. Results: Weight for age was close to the 50th percentile of the WHO growth standards for both boys (mean z score: 0.00) and girls (0.04) at most time points before 3 years of age. However, our participants were shorter at 3 years, where the z scores in height were -0.34 and -0.38 for boys and girls, respectively. Restricting the analysis to a subset matching the WHO criteria for healthy infants without restrictions on growth gave similar results. Conclusions: Although the WHO study group concluded there was a striking similarity in length/height among different populations, Hong Kong Chinese toddlers are, on average, shorter. Epigenetic constraints on growth coupled with the rapid epidemiological transition in Hong Kong may not have allowed sufficient generations for infants and children to reach their full genetic height potential, and with it the WHO standards. A universal infant growth standard may not be appropriate across all populations.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherBMJ Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.archdischild.com/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofArchives of Disease in Childhooden_HK
dc.subject.meshAging - physiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshAnthropometry - methodsen_HK
dc.subject.meshAsian Continental Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical dataen_HK
dc.subject.meshBirth Weighten_HK
dc.subject.meshBody Height - physiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshBody Mass Indexen_HK
dc.subject.meshBody Weight - physiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen_HK
dc.subject.meshCohort Studiesen_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshGrowthen_HK
dc.subject.meshHong Kongen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshInfanten_HK
dc.subject.meshInfant, Newbornen_HK
dc.subject.meshMaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshReference Valuesen_HK
dc.subject.meshWorld Health Organizationen_HK
dc.titleAre universal standards for optimal infant growth appropriate? Evidence from a Hong Kong Chinese birth cohorten_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailHui, LL: huic@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailSchooling, CM: cms1@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailCowling, BJ: bcowling@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH: hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM: gmleung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHui, LL=rp01698en_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySchooling, CM=rp00504en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCowling, BJ=rp01326en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/adc.2007.119826en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid17556396en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-48949107745en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros148413-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-48949107745&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume93en_HK
dc.identifier.issue7en_HK
dc.identifier.spage561en_HK
dc.identifier.epage565en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000256939000006-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHui, LL=12774460100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSchooling, CM=12808565000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCowling, BJ=8644765500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, SSL=23969113700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, GM=7007159841en_HK

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